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08
CPSC: Warnings - Consumer Product Safety Commission
• CPSC Warns Consumers to Immediately Stop Using Karriw Crib Bumpers Due to Suffocation Hazard; Violation of the Federal Ban on Crib Bumpers; Sold Exclusively on Amazon.com by Lucky_00

• CPSC Warns Consumers to Immediately Stop Using SplishSplashFun’s SplishSplash Balls Reusable Water Balloons with High-Powered Magnets Due to Ingestion Hazard; Violation of Federal Safety Regulation for Toys

• CPSC Warns Consumers to Immediately Stop Using Carrara High-Powered Magnetic Ball Sets Due to Ingestion Hazard; Failure to Meet Federal Safety Regulation for Toy Magnet Sets; Sold Exclusively at myKmarket.com

• CPSC Warns Consumers to Immediately Stop Using Magic QQ’s High-Powered Magnetic Ball Sets Due to Ingestion Hazard; Failure to Meet Federal Safety Regulation for Toy Magnet Sets; Sold Exclusively at Temu.com

• CPSC Warns Consumers to Immediately Stop Using Ming Tai Trade High-Powered Magnetic Ball Sets Due to Ingestion Hazard; Failure to Meet Federal Safety Regulation for Toy Magnet Sets; Sold Exclusively at Temu.com

• CPSC Warns Consumers to Immediately Stop Using Sunny House’s High-Powered Magnetic Ball Sets Due to Ingestion Hazard; Failure to Meet Federal Safety Regulation for Toy Magnet Sets; Sold Exclusively at Temu.com

• CPSC Warns Consumers to Immediately Stop Using Allvre High-Powered Magnetic Ball Sets Due to Ingestion Hazard; Failure to Meet Federal Safety Regulation for Toy Magnet Sets; Sold Exclusively at Temu.com
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Federal Register Notices:
• CBP Memphis Intercepts State's First-Ever Treehopper Bugs
• Antidumping or Countervailing Duty Investigations, Orders, or Reviews: Monosodium Glutamate From the Republic of Indonesia: Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review; 2021-2022
• Investigations; Determinations, Modifications, and Rulings, etc.: Certain Outdoor and Semi-Outdoor Electronic Displays, Products Containing Same, and Components Thereof
• Forged Steel Fittings From China, Italy, and Taiwan; Scheduling of Expedited Five-Year Reviews
• Antidumping or Countervailing Duty Investigations, Orders, or Reviews: Strontium Chromate From Austria: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review; 2021-2022
• Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review and Preliminary Determination of No Shipments; 2021-2022
• Fresh Garlic From the People's Republic of China: Preliminary Results, Partial Rescission, and Preliminary Intent To Rescind Antidumping Duty Administrative Review; 2021-2022
• Initiation of Antidumping and Countervailing Duty Administrative Reviews
• Aluminum Extrusions From the People's Republic of China, Indonesia, Mexico, and the Republic of Turkey: Postponement of Preliminary Determinations in the Countervailing Duty Investigations
• Antidumping or Countervailing Duty Investigations, Orders, or Reviews: Welded Stainless Pressure Pipe From India: Preliminary Results and Partial Rescission of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review; 2021-2022
• Chlorinated Isocyanurates From the People's Republic of China: Preliminary Results of the Countervailing Duty Administrative Review and Rescission of Review, in Part; 2021
• Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From Ecuador, India, Indonesia, and the Socialist Republic of Vietnam: Postponement of Preliminary Determinations in the Countervailing Duty Investigations
• Non-Refillable Steel Cylinders From the People's Republic of China: Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review and Final Determination of No Shipments; 2020-2022
• Aluminum Lithographic Printing Plates From the People's Republic of China: Postponement of Preliminary Determination in the Countervailing Duty Investigation
• Certain Steel Nails From the United Arab Emirates: Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review; 2021-2022
• Forged Steel Fittings From the People's Republic of China: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review, Preliminary Determination of No Shipments; 2021-2022
• Mattresses From Thailand: Final Results and Rescission of the Antidumping Duty Administrative Review; 2020-2022
• Certain Softwood Lumber Products From Canada: Notice of Reinstatement of Exclusion From the Countervailing Duty Order
• Certain Carbon and Alloy Steel Cut-To-Length Plate From Italy: Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review; 2021-2022
• Certain Aluminum Foil From Turkey: Preliminary Results of Countervailing Duty Administrative Review
• Refillable Stainless Steel Kegs From the People's Republic of China: Preliminary Results of the Antidumping Duty Administrative Review; 2021-2022
• Stainless Steel Sheet and Strip in Coils From Japan, the Republic of Korea, and Taiwan: Continuation of Antidumping Duty Orders and Countervailing Duty Order
• Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bar From the Republic of Turkey: Preliminary Results of Countervailing Duty Administrative Review and Rescission of Administrative Review, in Part; 2021
• Large Diameter Welded Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Final Results of Countervailing Duty Administrative Review; 2021
• Certain Aluminum Foil From the Republic of Turkey: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review; 2021-2022
• Mattresses From Indonesia: Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review; 2020-2022
• Certain Collated Steel Staples From the People's Republic of China: Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review; and Final Determination of No Shipments; 2021-2022
• Antidumping or Countervailing Duty Investigations, Orders, or Reviews: Certain Corrosion-Resistant Steel Products From Taiwan: Final Results of the Antidumping Duty Administrative Review and Final Determination of No Shipments; 2021-2022
• Silicomanganese From India: Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review; 2021-2022
• Diffusion-Annealed, Nickel-Plated Flat-Rolled Steel Products From Japan: Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review; 2021-2022
• Circular Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipe and Tube Products From Turkey: Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review; 2021-2022
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OTEXA: Announcements - ITA / Office of Textile & Apparel
12/06/2023 - October 2023 Textile and Apparel Import Report
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FTC Order Requires Old Southern Brass to Pay for False Claims of “Made in the USA” and Veteran Affiliations - Federal Trade Commission
Company must stop false claims, turn over money to FTC, and notify consumers
The Federal Trade Commission is taking action against Florida-based EXOTOUSA LLC. (d/b/a Old Southern Brass) for falsely claiming that certain company products were manufactured in the U.S, and that the company was veteran-operated and donated 10 percent of its sales to military service charities.
The FTC’s proposed order would stop the company and its owner, Austin Oliver, from making these deceptive claims and require them to pay a monetary judgment.
“This company and its owner’s brazen deception cheated consumers who wanted to support U.S. manufacturing, veteran-operated businesses, and veteran charities,” said Samuel Levine, Director of the FTC’s Bureau of Consumer Protection. “We will continue to hold accountable those who profit from false Made in USA and military association claims.”
According to the FTC’s complaint, Old Southern Brass made many claims on its website and advertising that the products it sold were made in the United States, including one post featuring “ ‘Merica Gifts for the ‘Merica Man In Your Life” that said “… all of our products are 100% American made, and nothing says ‘Merica like making products right here at home for ‘Merica man or woman alike.”
The complaint charges that, in spite of such claims, many of the company’s products were wholly imported from China or contained significant imported content.
In addition, the complaint points to numerous instances when Old Southern Brass claimed affiliation with the U.S. military, including that the company was veteran-operated, donated 10 percent of sales to military service charities, and that it sold products that included bullets or casings used by the U.S. military.
One post on the company’s website said “… as a veteran-operated business in the United States, our mission is to give back to fellow American patriots who have served and protected our country.”
A product listing on the company’s website advertised an engraved 50 caliber casing bottle opener as being “Handcrafted from an authentic 50 cal casing that was previously used by the U.S. military.”
Despite the company’s claims, the company was not operated by a veteran, and the products it sold as being used by the U.S. military were not actually used by the U.S. military. The complaint also charged that the company did not donate 10 percent of sales to veterans’ charities as it claimed. In fact, the company claimed charitable deductions that amounted to less than one-half of 1 percent of sales.
The FTC’s proposed order against the company and Oliver, which they have agreed to, prohibits them from making any false or misleading claims, including any about affiliation with or support of the U.S. military or veterans. It also requires that $150,000 must be turned over to the FTC.
The order also includes a number of requirements about the claims they make about the origin of their products:
• Restriction on unqualified claims: The company and Oliver will be prohibited from making unqualified U.S.-origin claims for any product, unless they can show that the product’s final assembly or processing—and all significant processing—takes place in the United States, and that all or virtually all ingredients or components of the product are made and sourced in the U.S.

• Requirement for qualified claims: The company and Oliver are required to include in any qualified Made in USA claims a clear and conspicuous disclosure about the extent to which the product contains foreign parts, ingredients or components, or processing.

• Requirement for assembly claims: The company and Oliver must also ensure, when claiming a product is assembled in the U.S., that it is last substantially transformed in the U.S., its principal assembly takes place in the U.S., and U.S. assembly operations are substantial.
The order includes a monetary judgment of $4,572,137.66, which is partially suspended due to the defendants’ inability to pay the full amount. If the Commission finds that the defendants lied about their financial status, the full amount of the judgment could become immediately payable.
The Commission vote to issue the administrative complaint and to accept the consent agreement was 3-0.
The FTC will publish a description of the consent agreement package in the Federal Register soon. The agreement will be subject to public comment, after which the Commission will decide whether to make the proposed consent order final. Instructions for filing comments appear in the published notice on regulations.gov.
NOTE: The Commission issues an administrative complaint when it has “reason to believe” that the law has been or is being violated, and it appears to the Commission that a proceeding is in the public interest. When the Commission issues a consent order on a final basis, it carries the force of law with respect to future actions. Each violation of such an order may result in a civil penalty of up to $50,120.
The lead staff attorney on this matter was Julia Solomon Ensor in the Bureau of Consumer Protection.
The FTC is committed to ensuring that “Made in USA” claims are truthful. The FTC’s Enforcement Policy Statement on U.S. Origin Claims provides guidance on making non-deceptive “Made in USA” claims. In addition, the FTC’s Made in USA Labeling Rule went into effect on Aug. 13, 2021. Companies that violate the Rule from that date forward may be subject to civil penalties.
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CBP Memphis Intercepts State's First-Ever Treetopper Bugs - U.S. Customs & Border Protection
Agency’s agriculture specialists spot potential danger on Persea sp leaves
MEMPHIS -- U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) agriculture specialists in Memphis recently intercepted rare treehopper bugs (Matcalfiellla Monogramma) on Persea sp leaves. – the first ever of its kind in the state of Tennessee. Treehoppers produce honeydew, which can promote the growth of harmful fungi, such as Sooty Mold on plants.
CBP agriculture specialists assigned to a local express consignment facility placed an Agriculture hold on a shipment from Mexico that had various food items listed on the manifest. The shipment was later presented for examination, revealing approximately 2.175kg beef, 1.995kg pork, and 0.45kg fresh Persea sp leaves. No documentation accompanied the shipment at the time of the exam, and no entry had been filed. The leaves were inspected, resulting in the interception of 2 living and 2 dead adult treehoppers. Federal officials later confirmed the interception as First-in-State Actionable Metcalfiella monogramma (Germar) (Membracidae). All prohibited items were destroyed by Steam Sterilization under CBPAS supervision.
CBP agriculture specialists have extensive training and experience in the biological sciences and agricultural inspection. On a typical day nationally last year, they inspected almost 1 million people as well as air and sea cargo imported to the United States, intercepting 240 different pests and 2,677 quarantine material interceptions such as plant, meat, animal byproduct, and soil at U.S. ports of entry.
CBP agriculture specialists protect our nation’s ag industry and the economy and way of life of the American people. These efforts are critical in preventing the outbreak of deadly diseases in the United States, which could result in health risks to Americans and economic disruption.
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$3.7 Million Dollar Fake Richard Mille Watch Seized by Cincinnati CBP - U.S. Customs & Border Protection
CINCINNATI — Last week, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers in Cincinnati seized a shipment containing a counterfeit watch. If the watch--which came from India--had been genuine, this single piece would have been worth over $3.78 million.
On November 16, officers seized the shipment containing a single Richard Mille watch. The shipment originated out of India and was headed to a residence in Palm Beach, Florida. Richard Mille brand offers limited quantity of each style, making each watch model unique. This watch seized was a RM 88 Automatic Winding Tourbillon Smiley. This limited edition was produced only 50 times making it extremely valuable. Black market sellers attempted to reproduce the look-alike Richard Mille RM 88 Smiley, but it takes one glimpse at the merchandise to know it’s a fake. The packaging, lack of fine details, its originating country and the fact that the shipment was uninsured all aided the officer’s determination that the merchandise was a counterfeit.
“CBP encourages honest trade and urges consumers to think twice before purchasing merchandise from unfamiliar online entities,” said Cincinnati Port Director Alrick Brooks. “Purchasing counterfeit goods enables criminal enterprises, and the profits made from these items fund their illicit activities. Officers at the Port of Cincinnati are dedicated to the CBP mission and work attentively for American consumers by stopping the flow of pirated merchandise.”
On November 17, officers seized a second shipment consisting of various counterfeit jewelry and watches with a total Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price (MSRP) of $846,695. The shipment originated in Hong Kong with a destination of Mesquite, Texas. The shipment consisted of brands including Rolex, Van Cleef, Chanel, and Louis Vuitton to name a few. CBP officers are trained to identify counterfeit merchandise and use their experience to stop the flow of such illicit merchandise in and out of the United States.
All of the counterfeit pieces were determined to be counterfeit by CBP’s Centers for Excellence and Expertise (CEEs), the agency’s trade experts.
“One important job we have at CBP is to protect intellectual property rights for American consumers and businesses,” said LaFonda D. Sutton-Burke, Director of Chicago Field Operations. “With the holidays approaching, consumers need to be ever vigilant when shopping online. Not only is it our job at CBP to stop the flow of counterfeit merchandise, but it is also the job of each consumer. If you notice suspected fraud, please report it.”
There are few ways consumers can safeguard themselves from spending money on imitations:
• Purchase goods directly from the trademark holder or from authorized retailers.

• Know what price the product should be selling for. If the item is prices well below fair market value, it could possibly be counterfeit. If a price seems too good to be true, then it probably is.

• Look for legitimate web sites that offer customer service contact information and return policies.

• Review CBP’s E-Commerce Counterfeit Awareness Guide for Consumers.
More information about the harms associated with the purchase of counterfeit goods is available on CBP’s Truth Behind Counterfeits website and StopFakes.gov. If you have any information regarding suspected fraud or illegal trade activity, please contact CBP through the e-Allegations Online Trade Violations Reporting System or by calling 1-800-BE-ALERT. IPR violations can also be reported to the National Intellectual Property Rights Coordination Center at https://www.iprcenter.gov/referral/ or by telephone at 1-866-IPR-2060.
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5 Ways to Savor the Holiday Season with a Local Twist - USDA
 
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