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Veterans and Scams - Federal Trade Commission
As we approach Veterans Day, we thank our veterans for their service and sacrifice. But not everyone has a vet’s best interests in mind. Whether you left the service decades ago or you’re planning your transition to civilian life, scammers will try to get you to send money or share personal information. Scammers also want to get their hands on the valuable benefits you earned through military service. What are some ways to know you’re dealing with a scammer?
First know how scammers operate. Imposter scams come in many varieties but they work the same way: scammers call, text, email, or reach out over social media and pretend to be someone you trust to convince you to send them money. Scammers may pretend to be from a government agency and say you need to pay a fine. Or they may pose as an online love interest who needs you to send money for an expensive medical procedure. The scammer may offer you a job, too, but say you need to pay a fee before you get hired. Scammers may claim to have some affinity with the military to gain your trust so you won’t dig too deep into what they’re saying.
Second, know how scammers ask you to pay. No matter what the story is, only scammers will insist that the only way you can pay is by cash, gift card, cryptocurrency, payment app, or a wire transfer service. These methods make it almost impossible to get your money back, which is why scammers insist you pay that way. Stop. Don’t pay.
Over the next few weeks, we’ll highlight some of the ways scammers try to get at your veterans benefits — and ways you can spot and avoid those scams. One way to recognize Veterans Day is to share the advice about avoiding scams and encourage the veterans you know to sign up for the latest updates to stay a step ahead of scammers.
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Federal Register Notices:
• Antidumping or Countervailing Duty Investigations, Orders, or Reviews: Common Alloy Aluminum Sheet From India: Final Results of Countervailing Duty Administrative Review; 2020-2021
• Certain Hot-Rolled Steel Flat Products From Japan: Preliminary Results and Partial Rescission of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review; 2021-2022
• Cast Iron Soil Pipe Fittings From the People's Republic of China: Final Results of the Expedited First Sunset Review of the Antidumping Duty Order
• Stainless Steel Flanges From India: Preliminary Results of Countervailing Duty Administrative Review and Partial Rescission of Review; 2021
• Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From the People's Republic of China: Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review; 2021-2022
• Stainless Steel Flanges From India: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review and Partial Rescission; 2021-2022
• Certain Hot-Rolled Steel Flat Products From the Republic of Korea: Preliminary Results and Partial Rescission of Countervailing Duty Administrative Review, 2021
• Certain Paper Shopping Bags From the People's Republic of China: Preliminary Affirmative Determination of Countervailable Subsidies, Preliminary Affirmative Determination of Critical Circumstances, and Alignment of Final Determination With Final Antidumping Duty Determination
• Phosphate Fertilizers From the Russian Federation: Final Results of Countervailing Duty Administrative Review; 2020-2021
• Cast Iron Soil Pipe Fittings From the People's Republic of China: Final Results of the Expedited First Sunset Review of the Countervailing Duty Order
• Certain Paper Shopping Bags From India: Preliminary Affirmative Determination of Countervailable Subsidies, Preliminary Affirmative Determination of Critical Circumstances in Part, and Alignment of Final Determination With the Final Antidumping Duty Determination
• Antidumping or Countervailing Duty Investigations, Orders, or Reviews: Common Alloy Aluminum Sheet From Spain: Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review; 2020-2022
• Common Alloy Aluminum Sheet From India: Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review; 2020-2022
• Phosphate Fertilizers From the Kingdom of Morocco: Final Results of Countervailing Duty Administrative Review; 2020-2021
• Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Mexico: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review; 2021-2022
• Wooden Cabinet and Vanities and Components Thereof From the People's Republic of China: Final Results and Final Determination of No Shipments of the Antidumping Duty Administrative Review; 2021-2022
• Wooden Cabinets and Vanities and Components Thereof From the People's Republic of China: Final Results and Partial Recission of Countervailing Duty Administrative Review; 2021
• Certain Aluminum Foil From People's Republic of China: Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review and Final Determination of No Shipments; 2021-2022
• Investigations; Determinations, Modifications, and Rulings, etc.: Seamless Carbon and Alloy Steel Standard, Line, and Pressure Pipe From Russia
• Antidumping or Countervailing Duty Investigations, Orders, or Reviews: Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bar From Mexico: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review; 2021-2022
• Investigations; Determinations, Modifications, and Rulings, etc.: Folding Gift Boxes From China; Determination
• Antidumping or Countervailing Duty Investigations, Orders, or Reviews: Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China: Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review; 2021-2022
• Chlorinated Isocyanurates From Spain: Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review; 2021-2022
• Heavy Walled Rectangular Welded Steel Pipes and Tubes From Mexico: Notice of Court Decision Not in Harmony With the Results of Antidumping Administrative Review; Notice of Amended Final Results
• Light-Walled Rectangular Pipe and Tube From the Republic of Korea: Final Affirmative Determination of Circumvention of the Antidumping Duty Order
• Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Final Affirmative Determination of Circumvention of the Antidumping Duty Order
• Light-Walled Welded Rectangular Carbon Steel Tubing From Taiwan: Final Affirmative Determination of Circumvention of the Antidumping Duty Order
• Certain Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipes and Tubes From India: Final Affirmative Determination of Circumvention of the Antidumping Duty Order
• Light-Walled Rectangular Pipe and Tube From the People's Republic of China: Final Affirmative Determination of Circumvention of the Antidumping Duty and Countervailing Duty Orders
• Circular Welded Carbon Quality Steel Pipe From the People's Republic of China: Final Affirmative Determination of Circumvention of the Antidumping Duty and Countervailing Duty Orders
• Antidumping or Countervailing Duty Investigations, Orders, or Reviews: Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China: Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review; 2021-2022
• Chlorinated Isocyanurates From Spain: Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review; 2021-2022
• Heavy Walled Rectangular Welded Steel Pipes and Tubes From Mexico: Notice of Court Decision Not in Harmony With the Results of Antidumping Administrative Review; Notice of Amended Final Results
• Light-Walled Welded Rectangular Carbon Steel Tubing From Taiwan: Final Affirmative Determination of Circumvention of the Antidumping Duty Order
• Certain Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipes and Tubes From India: Final Affirmative Determination of Circumvention of the Antidumping Duty Order
• Light-Walled Rectangular Pipe and Tube From the People's Republic of China: Final Affirmative Determination of Circumvention of the Antidumping Duty and Countervailing Duty Orders
• Circular Welded Carbon Quality Steel Pipe From the People's Republic of China: Final Affirmative Determination of Circumvention of the Antidumping Duty and Countervailing Duty Orders
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Modernization of Cosmetics Regulation Act of 2022 - FDA
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CBP’s Area Port of Boston Announces Agreement with Operator for a Centralized Examination Station - U.S. Customs & Border Protection
BOSTON — Today, the Area Port of Boston announced an agreement with Boston Freight Terminals, LLC to serve as operator of a Centralized Examination Station (CES), within the control of U.S. Customs and Border Protection. This new CES is located at 139 Shuman Avenue, Stoughton, Massachusetts.
CES are used by CBP to improve productivity and service by focusing resources and minimizing travel time required in performing cargo examinations at multiple facilities within a Port of Entry (POE).
"We are very happy to share that Boston Freight Terminals has been granted Centralized Examination Station (CES) status for the Port of Boston. CES operations started on November 6th, 2023,” Julio Caravia, Area Port Director. “As a CES, Boston Freight Terminals will work with U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) to ensure that examinations of imported and exported goods are completed in accordance with CBP policies. This allows us to streamline the customs clearance process and make it more efficient and cost effective for all businesses in the New England trade community.
With this agreement, subject to the Service Contract Act 1965, as amended, is effective for five (5) years. The CES operator provides a secure facility, less than 25 miles from the port entry, with adequate personnel and equipment, to ensure reliable service to all parties for inspection and closing of all types of cargo designated for examination by CBP.
CES operator can assess service fees according to the fee schedule submitted with its approved application (or as may be subsequently changed and approved by the Area Port Director pursuant to 19 C.F.R. § 118.5.
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CBP Nabs More Than $800K in Counterfeit Merchandise in Puerto Rico - U.S. Customs & Border Protection
SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico - In just two days, U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers and import specialists seized 44 shipments from various express consignment facilities in Puerto Rico containing products violating intellectual property rights. If the items were genuine, the combined Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price (MSRP) is estimated at $873,000.  
CBP seized products ranging from clothing and footwear to jewelry, purses and watches. The merchandise originated from China, Hong Kong, Malaysia, Colombia and Singapore.
“Illicit trade in counterfeit goods can be found in all products and all industries, representing a significant threat to America’s innovation economy, the competitiveness of our businesses, the livelihoods of U.S. workers and, in some cases, national security and the health and safety of consumers,” stated Efrain Rivas, Assistant Director of Field Operations for Trade at the San Juan Field Office. “This operation showcased our team’s unwavering commitment to safeguarding intellectual property and upholding the integrity of legitimate commerce.”
In the 2022 federal fiscal year, the San Juan Field Office made 1,377 Seizures with a combined MSRP of more than $36 million, while in fiscal year 2023, the Field Office executed 1,313 Seizures with a combined MSRP of nearly $21 million.
When shopping online consumers need to beware of counterfeit goods. Fake goods can lead to real dangers, which are not always obvious to consumers.
According to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, e-commerce is increasingly being used by counterfeiters to sell fake and dangerous items to consumers, some of whom actively seeking out low-priced fakes, while others purchase the items thinking they are genuine. CBP established an educational initiative to raise consumer awareness about the consequences and dangers associated with purchasing counterfeit and pirated goods online or in stores. More information about that initiative is available at www.cbp.gov/fakegoodsrealdangers. CBP has the authority to detain, seize, forfeit, and ultimately destroy merchandise seeking entry into the United States if it bears an infringing trademark or copyright that has been registered with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office or the U.S. Copyright Office, and has subsequently been recorded with CBP.
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Frozen or Fresh: Which Turkey Should You Buy? - USDA
It’s finally November. To beat the crowds, you rush to your grocery store to buy a turkey. If this is your first time, you’re faced with a dilemma: frozen or fresh?
Don’t worry. Here are some guidelines:
• Have more than a week before your meal? Choose frozen: A “frozen” turkey is a turkey that has been cooled to 0 F or lower. When purchasing a frozen turkey, leave enough time for defrosting.

• Have less than a week to prepare? Select fresh: The “fresh” label means the turkey has never been chilled below 26 F. Fresh turkeys should not be purchased until one or two days before you cook it, unless the manufacturer’s tag has a “Best by” or “Use by” date that indicates the turkey will be okay on the date you plan to cook it. If there is no tag, then purchase a fresh turkey one or two days before you plan to cook it.
While buying the rest of your Thanksgiving items, remember food product date tags are not safety dates.
• “Best if Used By/Before” indicates when a product will be of the best flavor or quality.
• “Freeze-By” indicates when a product should be frozen to maintain peak quality.
• “Sell-By” tells the store how long to display the product.
For more information on turkey products, check out our fact sheet. Learn about the latest USDA study on safe food handling and thorough handwashing.
Have a food safety question? Contact the USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline at 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854) to talk to a food safety specialist or chat live at ask.usda.gov from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday. On Thanksgiving Day, the Hotline will be open from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Eastern Time.
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BBB Scam Alert: Looking for this Season's Hot Toy? Beware of Scams - Better Business Bureau
Every year, there are always a few “must-have” toys on most kids’ holiday wish lists. The hot toy sells out fast and becomes expensive and hard to find. In 2023, the hot toy lists, such as this round-up from CNET or this article from Today.com, include Furby, Barbie Dreamhouse, Fingerlings, Bitzee, Lego, Elmo Slide, Dog-E, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Mayhem Pizza Fire Delivery Van, and Beast Lab.
If you are shopping for a child this holiday season, don’t let scammers trick you into accidentally buying a fake (or non-existent) version of a popular toy. Watch out for these tricks.
How the scam works

You are looking for this season’s hot toy, but it’s sold out at every store you visit. You decide to do a quick online search or spot an ad in your social media feed. This takes you to a website that miraculously has the toy in stock. The site may look professional and have original images of the product. It may even offer the product at discounted prices, claiming a “last-minute deal” or “flash sale.”
Unfortunately, many such offers are fake. In many cases reported to BBB Scam Tracker, buyers thought they were ordering a high-quality toy. Instead, they received a cheap counterfeit version. In other cases, the products never shipped and the websites vanished. In either case, when the dissatisfied customers tried to follow up with the company, they found that the staff either didn't respond or refused to provide a refund.
For example, one shopper told BBB Scam Tracker that they ordered a discounted Lego set online. “I waited a day or so and got back with the company on my order and was told this this is their busy season and will take longer to ship.” The shopper waited but never received a shipping confirmation. When they reached out again, the company offered to refund their order, but the shopper never got their money back.
Another shopper found what they thought was a great deal on a Barbie doll, but all they received was a credit card charge from a seemingly unrelated company. The shopper “clicked a link on Facebook (don't remember the website) that noted that Mattel was offering collectable Ken & Barbie movie dolls for $. They charged the card over $5. Charge was from [an unrelated company listed as] Quality Electronic Premium.”
Tips to avoid toy scams

Only buy toys from reputable stores and websites.The best way to avoid getting scammed when purchasing toys is to buy them directly from a seller you know and trust.
Don’t be fooled by extra-low prices.Unreasonably low prices are a red flag for a scam on many products. Avoid making a purchase from a retailer you aren’t familiar with just because the price sounds too good to be true – it probably is!
Research before you buy.If a company seems legitimate but you aren’t familiar with it, be extra careful with your personal information. Before offering up your name, address, and credit card information, make sure the company has a working customer service number.
 
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