New York - Miami - Los Angeles Friday, July 19, 2024
C-TPAT
  You are here:  Newsletter
 
Newsletters Minimize
 

03
Paper File Folders from China, India, and Vietnam Injure U.S. Industry, says USITC - U.S. International Trade Commission
The United States International Trade Commission (USITC) today (10/31/23) determined that a U.S. industry is materially injured by reason of imports of paper file folders from China, India, and Vietnam that the U.S. Department of Commerce (Commerce) has determined are sold in the United States at less than fair value and subsidized by the Government of India.
Chairman David S. Johanson and Commissioners Rhonda K. Schmidtlein, Jason E. Kearns, and Amy A. Karpel voted in the affirmative.
As a result of the Commission’s affirmative determinations, Commerce will issue antidumping duty orders on imports of this product from China, India, and Vietnam and a countervailing duty order on imports of this product from India.
The Commission’s public report Paper File Folders from China, India, and Vietnam (Inv. Nos. 701-683 and 731-TA-1594-1596 (Final), USITC Publication 5472, November 2023) will contain the views of the Commission and information developed during the investigations.
The report will be available by December 11, 2023; when available, it may be accessed on the USITC website at: http://pubapps.usitc.gov/applications/publogs/qry_publication_loglist.asp.
________________________________________________________________________________
Federal Register Notices:
• Antidumping or Countervailing Duty Investigations, Orders, or Reviews: Hydrofluorocarbon Blends From the People's Republic of China: Initiation of Circumvention Inquiry on the Antidumping Duty Order
• Raw Honey From the Socialist Republic of Vietnam: Initiation of Antidumping Duty Changed Circumstances Review
• Granular Polytetrafluoroethylene Resin From India: Notice of Court Decision Not in Harmony With the Final Determination of Countervailing Duty Investigation; Notice of Amended Final Determination and Amended Countervailing Duty Order
• Antidumping or Countervailing Duty Investigations, Orders, or Reviews: Truck and Bus Tires From Thailand; Institution of Antidumping Duty Investigation and Scheduling of Preliminary Phase Investigation
• Investigations; Determinations, Modifications, and Rulings, etc.: Tin- and Chromium-Coated Steel Sheet From Japan; Scheduling of a Full Five-Year Review
• Antidumping or Countervailing Duty Investigations, Orders, or Reviews: Notice of Scope Ruling Applications Filed in Antidumping and Countervailing Duty Proceedings
• Stainless Steel Flanges From India and the Peoples's Republic of China: Continuation of Antidumping and Countervailing Duty Orders
• Foundry Coke Products From the People's Republic of China: Continuation of the Antidumping Duty Order
• Aluminum Extrusions From the People's Republic of China, Indonesia, Mexico, and the Republic of Turkey: Initiation of Countervailing Duty Investigations
• Sales at Less Than Fair Value; Determinations, Investigations, etc.: Aluminum Extrusions From the People's Republic of China, Colombia, the Dominican Republic, Ecuador, India, Indonesia, Italy, the Republic of Korea, Malaysia, Mexico, Taiwan, Thailand, the Republic of Turkey, the United Arab Emirates, and the Socialist Republic of Vietnam: Initiation of Less-Than-Fair-Value Investigations
• Antidumping or Countervailing Duty Investigations, Orders, or Reviews: Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From Ecuador, India, Indonesia, and Vietnam; Institution of Antidumping and Countervailing Duty Investigations and Scheduling of Preliminary Phase Investigations
• Investigations; Determinations, Modifications, and Rulings, etc.: Certain Soft Projectile Launching Devices, Components Thereof, Ammunition, and Products Containing Same; Notice of Request for Submission on the Public Interest
• Antidumping or Countervailing Duty Investigations, Orders, or Reviews: Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From the People's Republic of China: Final Results of the Expedited Second Sunset Review of the Antidumping Duty Order
• Investigations; Determinations, Modifications, and Rulings, etc.: Clad Steel Plate From Japan; Institution of a Five-Year Review
• Certain Light-Based Physiological Measurement Devices and Components Thereof; Notice of the Commission's Final Determination Finding a Violation of Section 337; Issuance of a Limited Exclusion Order and a Cease and Desist Order; Termination of the Investigation
• Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bar From Belarus, China, Indonesia, Latvia, Moldova, Poland, and Ukraine; Institution of Five-Year Reviews
• Antidumping or Countervailing Duty Investigations, Orders, or Reviews: Carbon and Alloy Steel Threaded Rod From India: Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review, 2021-2022
• Certain Aluminum Foil From the People's Republic of China: Final Results of Countervailing Duty Administrative; 2021
• Antidumping or Countervailing Duty Order, Finding, or Suspended Investigation; Opportunity To Request Administrative Review and Join Annual Inquiry Service List
• Common Alloy Aluminum Sheet From the Republic of Turkey: Final Results of Countervailing Duty Administrative Review, 2020-2021
• Investigations; Determinations, Modifications, and Rulings, etc.: Phosphate Fertilizers From Morocco and Russia; Notice of Remand Proceedings; Correction
• Cast Iron Soil Pipe Fittings From China; Scheduling of Expedited Five-Year Reviews
• Antidumping or Countervailing Duty Investigations, Orders, or Reviews: Carbon and Alloy Steel Threaded Rod From India: Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review, 2021-2022
• Certain Aluminum Foil From the People's Republic of China: Final Results of Countervailing Duty Administrative; 2021
• Antidumping or Countervailing Duty Order, Finding, or Suspended Investigation; Opportunity To Request Administrative Review and Join Annual Inquiry Service List
• Common Alloy Aluminum Sheet From the Republic of Turkey: Final Results of Countervailing Duty Administrative Review, 2020-2021
• Investigations; Determinations, Modifications, and Rulings, etc.: Phosphate Fertilizers From Morocco and Russia; Notice of Remand Proceedings; Correction
• Cast Iron Soil Pipe Fittings From China; Scheduling of Expedited Five-Year Reviews
________________________________________________________________________________
Modernization of Cosmetics Regulation Act of 2022 - FDA
________________________________________________________________________________
FY 2023 Textile Enforcement Stats Show CPB's Efforts to Protect American Industry - U.S. Customs & Border Protection
CBP enforcement safeguards textile industry from fraudulent practices
WASHINGTON – U.S. Customs and Border Protection released fiscal year 2023 textile enforcement statistics today. The data reflects robust enforcement efforts that protect American workers and legitimate importers by taking action against unlawful textile imports that attempt to circumvent U.S. trade laws, including those related to U.S. trade agreements.
In FY 2023, CBP seized more than 5,000 textile shipments valued at more than $129 million, issued approximately $19.3 million in commercial fraud penalties, and conducted audits that identified over $2 million in additional duty owed to CBP. Additionally, CBP conducted laboratory analysis on 323 shipments, 42% of which were found to be mis-declared or mis-described when arriving to the United States. CBP also conducts verification visits internationally to factories that export textiles and apparel to the United States to verify origin and ensure compliance with preferential duty treatment claimed on imports. In FY 2023, CBP conducted 57 factory verification visits through its Textile Production Verification Team program resulting in approximately $340,000 in duties recovered and potential additional enforcement actions.
“The textile industry is crucial for the health of the American economy, employing more than half-a-million people in this country,” said AnnMarie R. Highsmith, Executive Assistant Commissioner for CBP’s Office of Trade. “It’s not lost on us that the work we do has a direct impact on the jobs and livelihoods of so many Americans and their families – it’s why we get up in the morning.”
CBP also has an e-Allegations portal where the public can report to CBP any suspected violations of trade laws or regulations related to imported goods. Given its mission to protect U.S. industries and businesses from unfair trade practices, CBP takes all trade violation allegations seriously. In FY 2023, CBP received 30 textile related e-allegations.
The textile sector is critical to the United States economy, and textiles are one of seven Priority Trade Issues for CBP. The domestic textile industry is the third largest exporter of textile-related products globally. Many U.S.-produced textiles, such as yarn and fabric, are sold to countries that partner in free trade agreements with the U.S., where U.S. yarn and fabric are used to make finished apparel and various textile goods. These goods are often imported into the United States, where they are eligible for duty free benefits if they comply with all the requirements of the applicable trade agreement.
Textiles typically carry a higher duty rate compared to other U.S. imports, with some as high as 32%. Violators try to circumvent trade duties using tactics like misrepresenting the country of origin of textile imports, mislabeling and undervaluing shipments, among other illegal schemes. These types of fraud undermine legitimate trade and threaten U.S. jobs.
CBP will remain vigilant to prevent fraudulent trade practices and penalize individuals and entities violating or circumventing textile tariffs and trade laws, thus ensuring fair competition, safeguarding the U.S. domestic industry, and protecting U.S. economic security.
For more information about CBP’s enforcement work and priority trade issues, visit CBP.gov/Trade and follow @CBPTradeGov on X.
________________________________________________________________________________
CBP Seizes Flammable Children’s Sleepwear - U.S. Customs & Border Protection
CHAMPLAIN, N.Y. – U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers at the Champlain Port of Entry seized a commercial shipment of children’s sleepwear that failed flammability requirement standards.
Back in August, CBP officers examined a shipment of children’s sleepwear that were manufactured in China. Working in collaboration with the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) a sample was provided for further testing. CPSC determined the products failed the flammability requirements under the Flammable Fabrics Act and recommended seizure. CBP seized 44 children’s sleepwear with an MSRP value of approximately $750.
“Our officers and specialists intercept threats before they reach the consumer, which provides another layer of safety to our nation and communities,” said Port Director Steven Bronson. “Working alongside CPSC, we are able to prevent these items from potentially causing serious health issues.”
With shipments such as this, intellectual property infringement is often at issue. The vast majority of children’s clothing that bear counterfeit trademarks or designs also pose health and safety risks, such as the failure to meet flammability standards, as they are made with inferior materials.
Nationwide during Fiscal Year 2022, CBP seized over 24.5 million shipments with Intellectual Property Rights violations worth just shy of $3 billion, had the goods been genuine.
Cooperative enforcement efforts prevent harmful and dangerous products from entering the country. Consumers should visit SaferProducts.gov or call CPSC’s toll-free hotline at (800) 638-2772 to report dangerous products or to learn about product recall information.
CBP has also established an educational initiative to raise consumer awareness about the consequences and dangers associated with the purchase of counterfeit and pirated goods. Information about the Truth Behind Counterfeits public awareness campaign can be found at:
https://cbp.gov/trade/fakegoodsrealdangers
Consumers can take simple steps to protect themselves and their families from counterfeit goods:
• Purchase goods directly from the trademark holder or from authorized retailers.

• When shopping online, read seller reviews and check for a working U.S. phone number and an address that can be used to contact the seller.

• Review CBP’s E-Commerce Counterfeit Awareness Guide for Consumers.
________________________________________
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Association of Zoos and Aquariums Announce Pilot Network in Southern California to Provide Care and Welfare for Animals Confiscated from Illegal Trade - Federal Trade Commission
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Association of Zoos and Aquariums today announced the launch of the Wildlife Confiscations Network in southern California. The network is a pilot program of AZA’s Wildlife Trafficking Alliance that provides a coordinated response for the care and wellbeing of wildlife confiscated from illegal trade.
Online marketplaces and social media have made it significantly easier for consumers to illegally acquire wild animals. Every year, millions of trafficked animals fuel this global demand. Wildlife trafficking decimates species in the wild, fuels criminal networks, destabilizes governments, encourages corruption and threatens human and animal health through the transmission of diseases.
“Wildlife trafficking is a serious crime that impacts imperiled species throughout the world,” said Martha Williams, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service director. “When live wild animals and plants are seized at U.S. ports of entry, it is critical to provide the highest standard of care as quickly as possible. It is also essential to grant safe and appropriate housing for species that cannot be returned to their country of origin. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is proud to work with a broad spectrum of law enforcement and conservation partners to ensure the health, wellbeing and proper care of all seized wildlife and plants in our custody. This newly established pilot program network will help conserve animals and plants for future generations.”
Successful wildlife law enforcement often involves the seizure, confiscation and holding of a diverse array of wild animals, notably at U.S. ports of entry or exit. In 2022, Service special agents and the Service’s law enforcement partners investigated over 10,000 wildlife trafficking cases and collected over $11,000,000 in criminal penalties. That same year, wildlife inspectors across the country worked alongside other federal agencies to process over 160,000 legal and declared shipments of wildlife products – and seize illegal shipments at U.S. ports of entry.
Through a cooperative agreement between the Service and AZA, the network will be a point of contact for wildlife law enforcement officers in southern California to lessen the logistical burden of searching for appropriate placement of trafficked animals. With a dedicated wildlife confiscations coordinator, wildlife law enforcement can now make a single phone call to relay the specific housing needs of the species involved. The coordinator will then refer to a list of fully vetted and permitted professional animal care facilities in the region to determine which can meet the case needs. Currently a pilot program, the network plans to replicate the framework developed in southern California throughout the U.S.
“Many AZA-accredited zoos and aquariums already work closely with law enforcement agencies to provide critical support for the victims of the illegal wildlife trade,” said Dan Ashe, AZA president and chief executive officer. “We are pleased to formalize this work by establishing the Southern California Wildlife Confiscations Network pilot program to ensure the ongoing conservation of threatened species and the wellbeing of individual animals. We will take what we learn in this process and begin to build out the network nationwide.”
“The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is proud of the work AZA has done to establish the Wildlife Confiscations Network,” said Ed Grace, assistant director of the Service’s Office of Law Enforcement. “Using the network to coordinate placement and care of seized live animals will enhance wildlife law enforcement’s ability to effectively combat illegal wildlife trafficking. This program exemplifies how working together can help serve the American public.”
If you encounter a potential wildlife crime, please report it to the Service’s wildlife trafficking tips line at 1-844-FWS-TIPS (397-8477) or online at: https://www.fws.gov/wildlife-crime-tips. If your tip leads to an arrest, or other substantial action, you may be eligible to receive a financial reward.
________________________________________________________________________________
CBP Reaches Milestone in Providing Relief to American Businesses Injured by Unfair Trade - U.S. Customs & Border Protection
CBP completes processing of imports subject to Continuing Dumping and Subsidy Offset Act; distribution of funds to continue
WASHINGTON — U.S. Customs and Border Protection announced today that it has processed all outstanding imports subject to the Continuing Dumping and Subsidy Offset Act of 2000, otherwise known as the Byrd Amendment. 
“Under the Continuing Dumping and Subsidy Offset Act, CBP has distributed billions of dollars of support to thousands of U.S. manufacturers, small businesses, and individuals harmed by anti-competitive behavior and unfair trade practices,” said CBP Executive Assistant Commissioner AnnMarie R. Highsmith. “The funds have provided much needed relief to affected industries and have helped level the playing field for American businesses.” 
Both dumping and subsidization occur when a foreign producer or exporter sells a product in the United States at a price that is below “normal value,” or is subsidized by a foreign government and injures U.S. manufacturers. The purpose of antidumping and countervailing duties assessed on dumped and subsidized imports is to provide fair competition for U.S. manufacturers.  
During the period of its implementation of the act, CBP disbursed $3.6 billion of antidumping and countervailing duties to affected domestic producers injured by foreign dumping and subsidies. The recipients included steel manufacturers, shrimp farmers, and honey producers, among others.  
In Fiscal Year 2023, CBP processed or “liquidated” the final 4,900 imports subject to the Continuing Dumping and Subsidy Offset Act after receiving the final instructions on the relevant antidumping and countervailing duties cases from the U.S. Department of Commerce. The distribution process for the duties collected from these final imports, as well as amounts held pending litigation and duties subject to ongoing collection efforts, will continue for an undetermined period, after which CBP’s implementation of the act will conclude and no further funds will be available for disbursement.  
The Continuing Dumping and Subsidy Offset Act was originally enacted Oct. 28, 2000, and provided that assessed duties received pursuant to an antidumping duty order, a countervailing duty order, or a finding under the Antidumping Act of 1921 would be distributed to affected domestic producers that file annual certifications. Congress repealed the act in 2005 but allowed that antidumping and countervailing duties collected on imports under the act filed before Oct. 1, 2007, would continue to be distributed to affected domestic producers. 
CBP’s antidumping and countervailing duties enforcement aims to mitigate harm by anti-competitive behavior and supports a level playing field for U.S. companies injured by unfair trade practices. To report a suspected trade violation, contact CBP through its e-Allegations program. 
For more information about CBP’s anti-dumping and countervailing duties efforts, contact CDSOA@cbp.dhs.gov.  
________________________________________________________________________________
FTC Sends Nearly $100 Million in Refunds to Vonage Consumers Who Were Trapped in Subscriptions by Dark Patterns and Junk Fees - Federal Trade Commission
The Federal Trade Commission is sending nearly $100 million in refunds to consumers who lost money as a result of internet phone service provider Vonage imposing junk fees and creating obstacles to those who try to cancel their service.
According to the FTC’s November 2022 complaint, Vonage used dark patterns to make it difficult for consumers to cancel their service and often continued to illegally charge them even after they spoke to an agent directly and requested cancellation. The company agreed to a settlement with the FTC that required it to pay refunds to consumers harmed by the company’s actions, make its cancellation process simple and transparent, and stop charging consumers without their consent.
The FTC is sending payments to 389,106 consumers. Most consumers will get a check in the mail. Recipients should cash their checks within 90 days, as indicated on the check. Eligible consumers who did not have an address on file will receive a PayPal payment, which should be redeemed within 30 days. Consumers who have questions about their payment should contact the refund administrator, Epiq, at 1-877-525-4728 or visit the FTC website to view frequently asked questions about the refund process. The Commission never requires people to pay money or provide account information to get a refund.
The Commission’s interactive dashboards for refund data provide a state-by-state breakdown of refunds in FTC cases. In 2022, Commission actions led to more than $392 million in refunds to consumers across the country.
 
  Copyright © 1997-2024 C-Air Privacy Statement | Terms Of Use