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**USITC to Synthesize and Review Information on the Distribution Effects of Trade and Trade Policy on U.S. Workers in Five Triennial Reports - U.S. International Trade Commission
The U.S. International Trade Commission (USITC) has instituted the first of five investigations that will synthesize and critically review information on the potential distributional effects of goods and services trade and trade policy on U.S. workers and underrepresented and underserved communities. The investigations were requested by the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) in a letter received on January 25, 2023.
This first investigation, Distributional Effects of Trade and Trade Policy on U.S. Workers, 2026 (Inv. No. 332-599), will build on information presented in the 2022 USITC report Distributional Effects of Trade and Trade Policy on U.S. Workers (Inv. No. 332-587). The Commission expects to submit its first report in the upcoming series to the USTR by January 20, 2026.
As requested, the USITC, an independent, nonpartisan, factfinding federal agency, will prepare a public report that will include information gathered through:
• Community-based open conversations targeted to the interests and concerns of specific underrepresented and underserved demographic and geographic communities. Additional information on the scope of the outreach is available in the Federal Register notice linked above;

• A symposium focused on academic or similar research on the distributional effects of trade and trade policy on underrepresented and underserved communities, including results of existing analysis, evaluation of methodologies, the use of public and restricted data in current analysis, identification of gaps in data and/or in the economic literature, and proposed analysis that could be done with restricted data; and

• Economic literature on the distributional effects of trade and trade policy on underrepresented and underserved communities including, among other things, the data limitations raised in these analyses.
The Commission intends to publish a notice in the Federal Register at a later date of the time, place, and procedures to be followed for the community-based discussions and academic symposium and for the filing of written submissions from interested parties for this first report.
As part of this investigation, the Commission will also host a virtual seminar series, the first of which will take place the week of October 16, 2023, that will be open to public observers. Invited researchers will present ongoing or recently completed work examining the potential distributional effects of goods and services trade and trade policy on US. workers and underrepresented and underserved communities. These seminars may also include relevant research from related fields outside trade, for example, examining the distributional effects of other policies on U.S. workers and underrepresented and underserved communities, to the extent such research would be useful in developing ways to analyze the distributional effects of trade. Another Commission-hosted seminar series is planned for 2024.
Information regarding all of the public events held in conjunction with this investigation, including agendas and access information for the two seminar series, will be posted on the investigation specific web page as it becomes available.
Further information on the scope of the investigation is available in the USITC’s notice of investigation, dated July 12, 2023, which can be downloaded from the USITC Internet site (www.usitc.gov) or may be obtained by contacting the Office of the Secretary at commissionhearings@usitc.gov, or by writing to the Secretary, U.S. International Trade Commission, 500 E Street SW, Washington, DC 20436.
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Federal Register Notices:
• Antidumping or Countervailing Duty Investigations, Orders, or Reviews: Agreement Suspending the Antidumping Duty Investigation on Sugar From Mexico: Final Results of the 2020-2021 Administrative Review
• Certain Passenger Vehicles and Light Truck Tires From the People's Republic of China: Final Results of Countervailing Duty Administrative Review and Rescission, in Part; 2021
• Steel Wire Garment Hangers From the Socialist Republic of Vietnam: Final Results of the Expedited Sunset Review of the Countervailing Duty Order
• Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China: Preliminary Results and Partial Rescission of the Antidumping Duty Administrative Review; 2021-2022
• Agreement Suspending the Countervailing Duty Investigation on Sugar From Mexico: Final Results of the 2021 Administrative Review
• Investigations; Determinations, Modifications, and Rulings, etc.: Greenhouse Gas Emissions Intensities of the U.S. Steel and Aluminum Industries at the Product Level
• Antidumping or Countervailing Duty Investigations, Orders, or Reviews: Crystalline Silicon Photovoltaic Cells, Whether or Not Assembled Into Modules, From the People's Republic of China: Final Results and Partial Rescission of Countervailing Duty Administrative Review; 2020
• Investigations; Determinations, Modifications, and Rulings, etc.: Aluminum Foil From China; Scheduling of Expedited Five-Year Reviews
• Antidumping or Countervailing Duty Investigations, Orders, or Reviews: Truck and Bus Tires From the People's Republic of China: Final Results and Partial Recission of Countervailing Duty Administrative Review; 2021
• Initiation of Antidumping and Countervailing Duty Administrative Reviews
• Certain Tool Chests and Cabinets From the People's Republic of China and the Socialist Republic of Vietnam: Continuation of Antidumping Duty Orders and Countervailing Duty Order
• Alloy and Certain Carbon Steel Threaded Rod From the People's Republic of China; Carbon and Alloy Steel Threaded Rod From the People's Republic of China: Initiation of Circumvention Inquiries on the Antidumping Duty Order and Countervailing Duty Order
• Investigations; Determinations, Modifications, and Rulings, etc.: Tool Chests and Cabinets From China and Vietnam; Determinations; Correction
• Certain LED Landscape Lighting Devices, Components Thereof, and Products Containing Same; Notice of a Commission Determination Not To Review an Initial Determination Granting a Joint Motion To Terminate the Investigation; Termination of Investigation
• Certain Playards and Strollers; Notice of a Commission Determination To Review in Part a Final Initial Determination Finding a Violation; Request for Written Submissions on the Issues Under Review and on Remedy, the Public Interest, and Bonding; Extension of Target Date
• Certain Polyester Staple Fiber From China; Scheduling of an Expedited Five-Year Review
• Antidumping or Countervailing Duty Investigations, Orders, or Reviews: Common Alloy Aluminum Sheet From the People's Republic of China: Initiation of Circumvention Inquiry of the Antidumping and Countervailing Duty Orders; Aluminum Sheet Further Processed in the Republic of Korea
• Investigations; Determinations, Modifications, and Rulings, etc.: Certain Location-Sharing Systems, Related Software, Components Thereof, and Products Containing Same; Notice of Commission Determination Not To Review Three Initial Determinations Terminating the Investigation as to Certain Respondents and in Its Entirety; Termination of the Investigation
• Honey From China; Scheduling of an Expedited Five-Year Review
• Cold-Drawn Mechanical Tubing From China, Germany, India, Italy, South Korea, and Switzerland; Scheduling of Full Five-Year Reviews
• Antidumping or Countervailing Duty Investigations, Orders, or Reviews: Prestressed Concrete Steel Wire Strand From Ukraine: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review and Preliminary Intent To Rescind, in Part; 2020-2022
• Certain Freight Rail Couplers and Parts Thereof From the People's Republic of China: Countervailing Duty Order
• Certain Freight Rail Couplers and Parts Thereof From the People's Republic of China: Antidumping Duty Order
• Dioctyl Terephthalate From the Republic of Korea: Notice of Initiation and Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty Changed Circumstances Review
• Multilayered Wood Flooring From the People's Republic of China: Continuation of Antidumping and Countervailing Duty Orders
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Philadelphia CBP Calls a Fowl on Unpermitted Wildlife Products - U.S. Customs & Border Protection
PHILADELPHIA – U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers seized two unique shipments from the United Kingdom that ran a-fowl of U.S. wildlife and import laws recently in Philadelphia.
CBP officers encountered the first shipment on May 23. It consisted of an arrangement of six colorful taxidermied birds perched on a branch. The birds were provisionally identified as two Regent Powerbirds, two Cotinga, one Blue-Bellied Roller, and one Oriole. The arrangement was destined to an address in Onondaga County, N.Y.
The second shipment arrived on June 13 and consisted of 20 horned mammal skulls. The skulls were destined to an address in Tampa, Fla.
CBP officers detained both shipments and consulted with inspectors from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) who advised CBP that the wildlife products violated U.S. wildlife import laws.
More specifically, the taxidermied birds arrangement violated the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (16 USC 703-712), as it is unlawful to kill, sell, possess, import, export or otherwise trade in listed species of migratory bird without prior government authorization. The stuffed birds required migratory bird import permits from the USFWS and from the U.S. Department of Agriculture Veterinary Services.
The horned skulls violated provisions of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), the U.S. Endangered Species Act, and the Lacey Act.
CBP officers seized the taxidermied birds on May 30 and the horned skulls on June 20, and turned both shipments over to USFWS investigations.
The USFWS investigation continues.
“American consumers should think twice before purchasing products either in whole or manufactured from wildlife because they may violate U.S. and international laws, but more importantly, they could be contributing to the end of an entire species of wildlife,” said Rene Ortega, CBP’s Acting Area Port Director in Philadelphia. “Customs and Border Protection officers and agriculture specialists will continue to work side-by-side with our U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service partners to intercept this illicit trade and to help put a dent into the unnecessary and illegal slaughter of endangered animal species for profit.”
The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora and the U.S. Endangered Species Act regulate the international trade in wildlife and animal-based products.
Illicit wildlife trade remains an international concern and is the leading cause pushing certain species to extinction.
According to CITES, the international trade in wildlife is estimated to be in the billions of dollars. Animals and plants are being exploited for a wide variety of consumer goods, including live and taxidermied specimens, food products, jewelry, clothing and accessories, musical instruments, tourist souvenirs, and many more products. CITES is one of the major international cooperation agreements that regulate lawful wildlife trade with the goal to safeguard wildlife from over-exploitation.
CBP's border security mission is led at our nation’s Ports of Entry by CBP officers and agriculture specialists from the Office of Field Operations. CBP screens international travelers and cargo and searches for illicit narcotics, unreported currency, weapons, counterfeit consumer goods, prohibited agriculture, invasive weeds and pests, and other illicit products that could potentially harm the American public, U.S. businesses, and our nation’s safety and economic vitality.
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OTEXA: Announcements - Office of Textile & Apparel
07/06/2023 – May 2023 Textile and Apparel Import Report
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SOPDOC Troy Miller addresses Green Trade Forum - U.S. Customs & Border Protection

SOPDOC Troy Miller addresses Green Trade Forum
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Reward Offered for Information about Vandalism of Protected Shorebird Nests in Far Rockaway - U.S. Fish & Wildlife
Federal investigators seek information about the intentional destruction of structures around two piping plover nests and removal of eggs within
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is offering a reward of up to $5,000 for information leading to the conviction of the person(s) responsible for the vandalism of two piping plover nests in Far Rockaway, New York.
The piping plover is protected as a threatened species under the federal Endangered Species Act (ESA). Maximum penalties under the ESA are a fine of $25,000 and/or imprisonment of up to six months for the take of each egg or individual bird.
Between 10:30 a.m. on Friday June 9, and 9:30 a.m. on Saturday, June 10, two nest exclosures — structures that are placed around individual shorebird nests to keep predators out — were intentionally damaged and two eggs were taken from each of the nests within.
Earlier this year, New York City Parks Department installed game cameras on the beach to monitor activity around nesting areas and officials are reviewing the footage for information.
Anyone with information about these incidents is asked to contact Service Special Agent Kathryn McCabe at 516-825-3950, or 1-844-FWS-TIPS (397-8477).
How you can help shorebirds
With ever-growing demands on our beaches, there are fewer places for shorebirds like the piping plover to raise families, feed and rest. The Service works closely with partners like the New York City Department of Parks & Recreation to protect and recover these species on public and private lands, but the public can help too by keeping the needs of shorebirds in mind when visiting the shore.
Here are five ways to make the beach more welcoming for birds:
1. Follow posted rules. You can help keep birds safe by respecting posted areas, knowing what you can and cannot do at the specific beach you are visiting, and understanding that beaches are birds’ homes.
2. Give birds space. Getting too close to birds when they are trying to eat or rest stresses them out and prevents them from caring for their chicks or refueling for their long flights.
3. Keep dogs on leash. Even good dogs frighten beach birds. A curious canine might accidentally hurt a bird.
4. Don’t leave trash on the beach, including food waste. It attracts predators, like raccoons, that prey on chicks and eggs.
5. Don’t feed birds. Gulls in particular are drawn to your lunch. Our food is not part of their natural diet, and more gulls can increase disturbance to some of the imperiled species we are trying to protect.
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CBP Seizes $3M in Counterfeit Watches - U.S. Customs & Border Protection
DALLAS – U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers at Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport seized five counterfeit Richard Mille watches originating from Hong Kong.
Officers seized the shipment of luxury watches destined to an individual in Oklahoma. With items such as these, officers work with import specialists from CBP’s Centers of Excellence and Expertise (CEE) to determine if the watches are counterfeit. Had the watches been genuine they would have been valued at over $3 million.
Counterfeit watches are made with inferior materials that lack the quality of genuine products and do not adhere to safety requirements. Consumers should be aware that purchasing counterfeit watches online could expose them to internet security risks, such as malware or ransomware, and could compromise their personal data and financial information shared during the purchase.
“CBP officers have experience and expertise in detecting counterfeit products,” said Dallas Area Port Director Jayson Ahern. “Their focus on intercepting fake goods protects consumers from purchasing items that may ultimately fund criminal organizations and activities such as forced labor and human and drug trafficking.”
On a typical day in fiscal year 2022, CBP seized $8 million worth of products with Intellectual Property Rights violations.
CBP has established an educational initiative at U.S. airports and online to raise consumer awareness and conscientiousness about the consequences and dangers that are often associated with the purchase of counterfeit and pirated goods. Information about the Truth Behind Counterfeits public awareness campaign is available at www.cbp.gov/fakegoodsrealdangers.
If you have any suspicion of or information regarding suspected fraud or illegal trade activity, please report the trade violation to e-Allegations Online Trade Violation Reporting. System or by calling 1-800-BE-ALERT.
Report Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) violations to the National Intellectual Property Rights Coordination Center at https://www.iprcenter.gov/referral/ or by telephone at 1-866-IPR-2060.
CBP conducts operations at ports of entry throughout the United States, and regularly screens arriving international passengers and cargo for narcotics, weapons, and other restricted or prohibited products. CBP strives to serve as the premier law enforcement agency enhancing the Nation’s safety, security, and prosperity through collaboration, innovation, and integration.
Photo cutline: CBP officers in Dallas seized these counterfeit luxury watches with a MSRP of over $3 million.
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FTC Sends Cease and Desist Letters with FDA to Companies Selling Edible Products Containing Delta-8 THC in Packaging Nearly Identical to Food Children Eat - Federal Trade Commission
Commission demands firms immediately change unfair and deceptive packaging
As part of its ongoing monitoring of health-related advertising claims, the Federal Trade Commission today sent cease and desist letters – jointly with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) – to six companies currently marketing edible products containing Delta-8 tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in packaging that is almost identical to many snacks and candy children eat, including Doritos tortilla chips, Cheetos cheese-flavored snacks, and Nerds candy.
“Marketing edible THC products that can be easily mistaken by children for regular foods is reckless and illegal,” said Samuel Levine, Director of the FTC’s Bureau of Consumer Protection. “Companies must ensure that their products are marketed safely and responsibly, especially when it comes to protecting the well-being of children.”
“Children are more vulnerable than adults to the effects of THC, with many who have been sickened and even hospitalized after eating ‘edibles’ containing it. That’s why we’re issuing warnings to several companies selling copycat food products containing delta-8 THC, which can be easily mistaken for popular foods that are appealing to children and can make it easy for a young child to ingest in very high doses without realizing it,” said Janet Woodcock, M.D., Principal Deputy Commissioner, FDA.
The agencies sent letters to the following companies: 1) Delta Munchies LLC (Los Angeles, California); 2) Exclusive Hemp Farms (Gilroy, California) and Etienne-DuBois, LLC/Oshipt (Henrico, Virginia); 3) North Carolina Hemp Exchange, LLC, dba NC Hemp Shoppe (Raleigh, North Carolina; 4) Dr. Smoke, LLC, aka Dr. S, LLC (Kansas City, Missouri); 5) Nikte's Wholesale, LLC (Albuquerque, New Mexico); and 6) The Haunted Vapor Room (Franklin, New Jersey).
According to the letters, after reviewing online marketing for Delta-8 THC products sold by the six companies, the FTC has determined that their advertising may violate Section 5 of the FTC Act, which prohibits unfair or deceptive acts in or affecting commerce, including practices that present unwarranted health or safety risks. The letters stress that preventing practices that present such risks, particularly to children, is one of the Commission’s highest priorities, and that imitating non-THC-containing food products that children consume is misleading.
The companies’ Delta-8 THC products mimic a range of food that appeal to children. Dr. Smoke, LLC, for example, sells THC-infused “Doritos” that are marketed in packaging that is nearly the same as that of Doritos Nacho Cheese Flavored Tortilla Chips (see graphic), including using the same red background, the use of the Doritos name and triangle logo, and the depiction of two tortilla chips in the same position. In addition, Dr. Smoke’s THC-infused “Cheetos” are sold in packaging that is nearly identical to that of Cheetos Crunchy Flamin’ Hot Cheese Flavored Snacks, right down to the use of the Chester Cheetah mascot.
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