New York - Miami - Los Angeles Tuesday, February 27, 2024
C-TPAT
  You are here:  Newsletter
 
Newsletters Minimize
 

14
Further Curbing Russia’s Efforts to Evade Sanctions and Perpetuate its War Against Ukraine - U.S. Department of State
Today (4/12/23), the Department of State and the Department of Treasury are imposing sanctions on more than 120 entities and individuals across more than 20 countries and jurisdictions in connection with the Russian Federation’s unlawful and unprovoked invasion of Ukraine, including facilitators of sanctions evasion.
More than one year into Russia’s unprovoked invasion of Ukraine, the effects of our globally coordinated sanctions have forced the Russian Federation to search for alternate routes to finance and fuel its war machine. In coordination with the United Kingdom, we are targeting sanctions evasion network supporting one of Russia’s wealthiest billionaires, Alisher Usmanov, who was sanctioned by the United States last year. In addition to the Usmanov-linked evasion network we are also targeting USM Holding, the primary entity through which Usmanov owns and controls the majority of his companies.
Additionally, the Department of State is sanctioning two Russian entities that support Russia’s efforts to undermine the sovereignty and territorial integrity of Ukraine through the militarization and indoctrination of schoolchildren: The All Russian Children’s and Youth Military Patriotic Public Movement Youth Army, and the State Budgetary Educational Institution of Additional Education of the Republic of Crimea Crimea Patriot Center.
Today’s action also includes the designation of several entities operating in the defense sector of Russia’s economy and entities supporting Russia’s war against Ukraine, including a new Russian private military company and a People’s Republic of China (PRC) based firm that has provided satellite imagery of locations in Ukraine to entities affiliated with the Wagner private military company that is fighting in Ukraine on Putin’s behalf.
Finally, we are designating additional persons associated with the Russian State Atomic Energy Corporation, Rosatom. Russia uses energy exports, including in the nuclear sector, to exert political and economic pressure on its customers globally.
The United States will continue to take action against Russia and those supporting its war in Ukraine, including further implementing the G7’s commitment to impose severe consequences on third country actors who support Russia’s war in Ukraine.
________________________________________________________________________________

Federal Register Notices:
• Antidumping or Countervailing Duty Investigations, Orders, or Reviews: Strontium Chromate From Austria: Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review; 2020-2021
• Monosodium Glutamate From the Republic of Indonesia: Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review; 2020-2021
• Certain Steel Racks and Parts Thereof From the People's Republic of China: Final Results and Partial Rescission of Countervailing Duty Administrative Review; 2020
• Certain Steel Racks and Parts Thereof From the People's Republic of China: Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review and Final Determination of No Shipments; 2020-2021
• Forged Steel Fittings from the People's Republic of China: Final Results of Countervailing Duty Administrative Review; 2020
• Initiation of Antidumping and Countervailing Duty Administrative Reviews
• Antidumping or Countervailing Duty Investigations, Orders, or Reviews: Certain Cold-Rolled Steel Flat Products From the Republic of Korea: Final Results and Partial Rescission of Countervailing Duty Administrative Review; 2020
• Investigations; Determinations, Modifications, and Rulings, etc.: Certain Electronic Anti-Theft Shopping Cart Wheels, Components Thereof and Systems Containing the Same; Institution of Investigation
• Certain Casual Footwear and Packaging Thereof; Notice of a Commission Determination To Review in Part a Final Initial Determination Finding No Violation; Request for Written Submissions on the Issues Under Review, Remedy, Bonding, and the Public Interest
• Antidumping or Countervailing Duty Investigations, Orders, or Reviews: Certain Lined Paper Products From India: Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review and Final Determination of No Shipments; 2020-2021
• Ripe Olives From Spain: Final Results of Countervailing Duty Administrative Review; 2020; Correction
• Uranium From the Russian Federation: Continuation of Suspension of Antidumping Investigation
• Magnesium Metal From the People's Republic of China: Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review; 2021-2022
• Circular Welded Carbon Quality Steel Pipe From the People's Republic of China: Preliminary
• Affirmative Determination of Circumvention of the Antidumping Duty and Countervailing Duty Orders
• Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Italy, Malaysia, and the Philippines: Continuation of Antidumping Duty Orders
• Light-Walled Welded Rectangular Carbon Steel Tubing From Taiwan: Preliminary Affirmative Determination of Circumvention of the Antidumping Duty Order
• Light-Walled Rectangular Pipe and Tube From the People's Republic of China: Preliminary Affirmative Determination of Circumvention of the Antidumping Duty and Countervailing Duty Orders
• Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Preliminary Affirmative Determination of Circumvention of the Antidumping Duty Order
• Certain Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipes and Tubes From India: Preliminary Affirmative Determination of Circumvention of the Antidumping Duty Order
• Common Alloy Aluminum Sheet From the People's Republic of China: Preliminary Affirmative Determination of Circumvention
• Light-Walled Rectangular Pipe and Tube From the Republic of Korea: Preliminary Affirmative Determination of Circumvention of the Antidumping Duty Order
• Certain Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Taiwan and Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Taiwan: Negative Preliminary Determinations of Circumvention of the Antidumping Duty Orders
• Antidumping or Countervailing Duty Investigations, Orders, or Reviews: Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Belarus, Italy, Russia, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Turkey, Ukraine, the United Arab Emirates, and the United Kingdom; Scheduling of Expedited Five-Year Reviews
• Investigations; Determinations, Modifications, and Rulings, etc.: Certain Refrigerator Water Filtration Devices and Components Thereof; Notice of Commission Final Determination To Issue a Limited Exclusion Order and Cease and Desist Orders; Termination of the Investigation
• Certain LED Landscape Lighting Devices, Components Thereof, and Products Containing Same; Institution of Investigation
• Paper Clips From China
• Multilayered Wood Flooring From China; Scheduling of Expedited Five-Year Reviews
________________________________________________________________________________
Pharmaceutical Distributer Agrees to Pay $765,000 to Resolve False Claims Act Allegations Relating to Failure to Pay Customs Duties - Department of Justice
In 2022, The Justice Department announced today that Danco Laboratories, LLC (Danco), located in New York, has agreed to pay $765,000 to resolve allegations that it violated the False Claims Act by failing to pay certain customs duties, known as marking duties, on imported pharmaceutical products that lacked markings to identify their country of origin.
The Tariff Act of 1930 requires companies that import foreign products into the United States to mark the country of origin on those products. Importers that fail to mark their products are subject to a 10% ad valorem duty. The settlement resolves allegations that, during the period 2011 through 2019, Danco failed to mark imported pharmaceutical products with the appropriate country of origin, and thereafter violated the False Claims Act by knowingly avoiding the marking duties owed to the United States for those imports.
“The False Claims Act protects the public fisc by imposing liability not only on those who knowingly submit false claims to the United States, but also on those who knowingly avoid obligations owed to the United States,” said Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General Brian M. Boynton, head of the Justice Department’s Civil Division. “This settlement demonstrates the department’s commitment to ensure that importers properly pay all amounts due under our customs laws.”
“Our office is committed to ensuring that importers are transparent with consumers and comply with customs laws and the False Claims Act,” said U.S. Attorney Brit Featherston. “We will continue to pursue aggressively those who seek to avoid their duties and obligations under the law.”
“The United States has required imported goods to be marked with their country of origin for generations, so American consumers can use that information in their purchasing decisions,” said Director Frank Russo of the U.S. Customs and Broder Protection (CPB) New York Field Office. “CBP takes the marking laws very seriously, and is pleased to work with our partners to ensure importers adhere to all customs laws.”
The civil settlement includes the resolution of claims brought by the Life Legal Defense Foundation under the qui tam or whistleblower provisions of the False Claims. These provisions allow a private party, known as a relator, to file an action on behalf of the United States and receive a portion of any recovery. The qui tam action is captioned U.S. ex rel. Life Legal Defense Foundation v. ASD Specialty Healthcare, LLC, et al., No. 21-cv-0088 (E.D. Tex.). As part of today’s resolution, the whistleblowers will receive approximately $115,000.
The resolution obtained in this matter was the result of a coordinated effort between the Justice Department’s Civil Division, Commercial Litigation Branch, Fraud Section, and the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of Texas with assistance from CPB.
The matter was handled by Trial Attorney Daniel W. Kastner of the Justice Department’s Civil Division and Assistant U.S. Attorneys James Gillingham and Adrian Garcia for the Eastern District of Texas.
The claims resolved by the settlement are allegations only, and there has been no determination of liability.
________________________________________________________________________________
24 hours 2,400 pieces of counterfeit jewelry worth over $4.41M seized by Louisville CBP - U.S. Customs & Border Protection
LOUISVILLE, Ky – -In 24 hours, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers in Louisville seized three shipments of jewelry for bearing counterfeit designer trademarks while attempting importation into the United States.
On April 3, two shipments, originating from the same location in Hong Kong, were heading to the same private residence in Jeffersonville, Indiana, but with different recipient names. One shipment contained 400 bracelets bearing suspect Van Cleef and Arpels trademarks, while the second shipment contained 993 jewelry sets bearing suspect Van Cleef and Arpels trademarks. Officers submitted documentation and photographs to CBP’s trade experts at the Consumer Products and Mass Merchandising Center of Excellence and Expertise (CEE), who determined that the merchandise was not authentic, and bore infringing trademarks that had been recorded with CBP for border enforcement through the e-Recordation program. Had the items been genuine, the total Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price (MSRP) would have been $3.7 million.
The next day, CBP officers held another parcel for inspection. This shipment was also from Hong Kong, but this time was heading to a residence in Cleveland, Ohio. Inside officers found 1,367 counterfeit pendants that bore recorded trademarks:537 bearing suspect Chanel marks, 155 bearing suspect Dior marks, 155 bearing suspect Louis Vuitton marks, 245 bearing suspect Gucci marks, 75 bearing suspect Fendi marks, 60 bearing suspect Yves Saint Laurent marks, 40 bearing suspect Tiffany & Company marks, 66 bearing suspect Versace marks, 20 bearing suspect Givenchy marks, 10 bearing suspect MCM marks, 20 bearing suspect Dolce & Gabbanamarks, 10 bearing suspect MLB Yankees marks, and 10 bearing suspect MLB Dodgers marks. Once again, officers submitted documentation and photographs to CBP’s trade experts at the Consumer Products and Mass Merchandising CEE who determined that the merchandise was not authentic, and bore infringing trademarks that had been recorded with CBP for border enforcement through the e-Recordation program. The total MSRP for this shipment would have been $710, 295, had these items been real.
These shipments were turned over to Homeland Security Investigations, the investigating arm of the Department of Homeland Security, and an investigation is ongoing.
Intellectual property is an important component of the U.S. economy, and Louisville Port Director Thomas Mahn emphasized the critical role CBP plays in protecting the economy and consumer safety and health. “No one buys a luxury brand piece of jewelry expecting it to fail or fall apart. As consumers increasingly purchase from online or third party vendors, our officers are at the frontline to guard against defrauders expecting to make money selling fake merchandise.”
“Substandard and illegal products harm the U.S. economy and the health and safety of consumers,” said LaFonda D. Sutton-Burke, Director, Field Operations, Chicago Field Office. “Once again our CBP officers at the Port of Louisville have demonstrated their exceptional skill and superior commodity expertise.”
Commonly, these goods are sold in underground outlets and on third party e-commerce websites. Online listings will often use images of the genuine designer product, defrauding purchasers who are expecting to receive the real thing.
CBP Trade protects the intellectual property rights of American businesses through an aggressive Intellectual Property Rights enforcement program, safeguarding them from unfair competition and use for malicious intent while upholding American innovation and ingenuity. CBP has the authority to detain, seized, forfeit, and ultimately destroy merchandise seeking entry into the United States if it bears an infringing trademark or copyright that has been recorded with CBP through the e-Recordation program. https://iprr.cbp.gov/s/.
Every year, CBP seizes millions of counterfeit goods from countries around the world as part of its mission to protect U.S. businesses and consumers. These goods include fake versions of popular products, such as smartphones and related accessories, electronics, apparel, shoes, cosmetics, and high-end luxury goods, as well as goods posing significant health and safety concerns, such as counterfeit pharmaceuticals, bicycle and motorcycle helmets, medical devices, supplements and other consumables. Sold online and in stores, counterfeit goods hurt the U.S. economy, cost Americans their jobs, threaten consumer health and safety, and fund criminal activity. Visit the National IPR Coordination Center for more information about IPR including counterfeiting and piracy.
Nationwide in Fiscal Year 2022, CBP seized over 24.5 million IPR violating items that would have been worth just shy of $3 billion, had the goods been genuine. CBP has established an educational initiative to raise consumer awareness about the consequences and dangers that are often associated with the purchase of counterfeit and pirated goods. Information about the Truth Behind Counterfeits public awareness campaign can be found at https://www.cbp.gov/FakeGoodsRealDangers.
CBP encourages anyone with information about counterfeit merchandise illegally imported into the United States to submit an e-Allegation. The e-Allegation system provides a means for the public to anonymously report to CBP any suspected violations of trade laws or regulations related to the importation of goods in the U.S.
CBP’s border security mission is led at 328 ports of entry by CBP officers from the Office of Field Operations. Please visit CBP Ports of Entry to learn more about how CBP’s Office of Field Operations secures our nation’s borders. Learn more about CBP at www.CBP.gov.
________________________________________________________________________________
FTC Ramps Up Fight to Close the Door on Illegal Robocalls Originating from Overseas Scammers and Imposters - Federal Trade Commission
Project Point of No Entry delivers strong message to “gateway” voice service providers to stop bad traffic from entering the United States or face the consequences
As the menace of unwanted illegal robocalls continues, U.S. consumers are bombarded by millions of these calls each month, both to their landlines and cell phones. Data show that a significant proportion, if not the majority, of illegal robocalls originate from overseas.
To stop these illegal overseas calls, the Federal Trade Commission has implemented Project Point of No Entry (PoNE), targeting “point of entry” or “gateway” Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) service providers and warning they must work to keep illegal robocalls out of the country.
“Project Point of No Entry is yet another way the FTC is sending VoIP service providers the clear message that the Commission will not stand by as illegal robocalls blast American phones,” said Samuel Levine, Director of the Bureau of Consumer Protection. “We will use all of our tools to stop companies that knowingly permit illegal calls to flood into the country.”
Project Point of No Entry

Through Project PoNE, the FTC is disrupting foreign-based scammers and imposters responsible for blasting U.S. consumers with annoying and unwanted calls. Through Project PoNE, the Commission: 1) identifies point of entry VoIP service providers that are routing or transmitting illegal call traffic, 2) demands they stop doing so and warns their conduct may violate the Telemarketing Sales Rule, and then 3) monitors them to pursue recalcitrant providers, including by opening law enforcement investigations and filing lawsuits when appropriate.
The FTC can seek civil penalties and court injunctions to stop TSR violations. It can also seek money to refund to consumers who were defrauded via illegal telemarketing calls. The FTC coordinates directly with the agency’s federal and state partners, which support the program and pursue their own actions to fight illegal telemarketing robocalls.
Quantifiable Results

Results to date have shown that Project PoNE is having a significant impact in the fight to stop illegal calls.
Through the FTC’s enforcement efforts and its collaboration with partners, such as the Industry Traceback Group (ITG), the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), and state attorneys general, Project PoNE has uncovered the activity of 24 target point of entry service providers responsible for routing and transmitting illegal robocalls between 2021 and 2023, in connection with approximately 307 telemarketing campaigns, including government and business imposters, COVID-19 relief payment scams, and student loan debt relief and forgiveness schemes, among others. According to ITG, a single campaign often represents hundreds of thousands or millions of calls.
The FTC demanded that each of the target providers stop allowing illegal robocalls into the United States, warning of potential law enforcement action for illegal conduct. ITG traceback data show that after being contacted by Project PoNE staff, 22 of the 24 targets significantly curbed or altogether stopped the flow of illegal robocalls entering the country over their networks.
Designated by the FCC as the official traceback consortium, ITG uses its traceback process to seek out the source of suspicious traffic and shares information with law enforcement when appropriate. Each traceback represents a snapshot of any given campaign.
Before being contacted by the FTC, the targets had a combined total of 1,043 tracebacks. After being contacted and warned about their possibly illegal conduct, that number dropped to 196, illustrating Project PoNE’s effectiveness at stopping illegal robocalls before they could enter the country. Of the 196, 147 are linked to two uncooperative providers, one of which is subject to an FCC law enforcement action.
The FTC is making available to the public recordings of the robocalls that the targets have allowed into the country at Project Point of No Entry Letters . Making these recordings available will help consumers identify and avoid the various scams delivered by illegal robocalls. The FTC’s East Central Region is spearheading Project PoNE.
________________________________________________________________________________
FTC Approves Final Order against The Bountiful Company in First Case Alleging Hijacking of Online Product Reviews - Federal Trade Commission
Following a public comment period, the Federal Trade Commission has approved a final consent order against The Bountiful Company for abusing a feature of Amazon.com to deceive consumers into thinking that its newly introduced supplements had more product ratings and reviews, higher average ratings, and “#1 Best Seller” and “Amazon’s Choice” badges.
The FTC’s February 2023 complaint alleged that by manipulating Amazon.com product pages, Bountiful misrepresented the reviews, the number of Amazon reviews and the average star ratings of some products, and that some of them were number one best sellers or had earned an Amazon Choice badge. The case against Bountiful marked the FTC’s first law enforcement challenging “review hijacking,” in which a marketer steals or repurposes reviews of another product.
In addition to requiring that Bountiful pay $600,000 as monetary relief for consumers, the final order prohibits Bountiful from making similar types of misrepresentations and bars the company from using deceptive review tactics that distort what consumers think about its products or services.
The March 28, 2023, Commission vote approving the final consent order was 4-0. Staff attorneys in the FTC’s Advertising Practices Division handled this matter.
 
  Copyright © 1997-2023 C-Air Privacy Statement | Terms Of Use