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CBP Issues Guidance on 2013 Sukkot Holiday Travel
U.S. Customs & Border Protection / http://www.cbp.gov/xp/cgov/newsroom/news_releases/national/09122013_4.xml

Travel Period is Sept. 15 to Oct. 4

Washington — U.S. Customs and Border Protection reminds travelers of guidance related to the annual Jewish holiday known as Sukkot.

The travel period for the holiday is September 15 through October 4 and the holiday itself begins September 18, after sundown, and lasts through September 25. Items carried by observant Jewish travelers entering the United States during the Sukkot holiday are regulated to prevent the introduction of invasive pests and diseases; however, these items might be allowed into the United States after inspection by CBP Agriculture Specialists. These items include ethrogs, palm fronds, twigs of willow and myrtle.

The following guidance is provided for travelers:

Ethrogs:
Personal shipments of ethrogs are allowed entry through North Atlantic and Northern Pacific ports of entry after inspection by CBP agriculture specialists. North Atlantic ports are defined as Atlantic ports north of and including Baltimore; ports on the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Seaway; Canadian Border ports east of and including North Dakota; Andrews Air Force Base and Washington, D.C. (including Dulles) for air shipments. Northern Pacific ports are defined as Pacific ports north of California including Alaska, Canadian Border ports west of and including Montana, excluding Hawaii.

  • Travelers will be asked to open the container with the ethrog and unwrap it. The agriculture specialist will inspect the ethrog. If either insect stings or pests are found, the ethrog will be prohibited from entering the United States. If neither is found, the traveler will be allowed to rewrap and re-box the ethrog for entry into the United States.

Palm Fronds:

  • Single palm fronds, for religious purposes, will be inspected by agriculture specialists and released if no pests or symptoms of disease are found.
  • Twigs of Willow:

    If the twigs of willow are from Europe, they will be prohibited from entering the United States. If they are from other than Europe, they will be inspected by agriculture specialists and released if no pests or symptoms of disease are found.
  • Also, if the twigs of willow are green in color, have soft tissue present, or have buds that sprouted, then they are capable of being grown and are prohibited from entering the United States.

Twigs of Myrtle:

  • Twigs of myrtle will be inspected by agriculture specialists and released if no pests or symptoms of disease are found.

If travelers have any concerns resulting from the inspection of their religious items at a port of entry, a CBP supervisor is always available to answer questions and address their concerns. CBP is committed to treating all travelers, including travelers who may be observing Sukkot, with respect and dignity at all U.S. ports of entry.


Pharmaceutical CEE Industry Meeting Charts the Future for CBP’s Trade Operations
U.S. Customs & Border Protection  / http://www.cbp.gov/xp/cgov/trade/trade_transformation/industry_int/pharm_cee_meeting.xml

U.S. Customs and Border Protection’s (CBP) Pharmaceutical, Health and Chemicals Center of Excellence and Expertise (CEE) joined partners from the government and the private sector for an industry meeting in August. The two-day workshop at Pfizer’s headquarters in New York City featured a robust agenda on issues facing the pharmaceutical, health and chemical industries.

Mr. Leon Hayward, Pharmaceutical, Health and Chemicals CEE Director, organized the discussion on CBP’s continued outreach efforts. “The CEEs were designed as the centerpiece of CBP’s 21st Century trade modernization efforts,” said Mr. Hayward, who lauded the success of the CEEs, which now cover all 97 chapters of the Harmonized Tariff Schedule. "The CEEs represent one of the most significant changes in how the United States processes trade since the Customs Service was established in 1789,” said Mr. Hayward.

CBP’s CEEs process participating importers within 10 CEE industries by account, allowing CBP to quickly adapt to changes within an industry. By the end of 2013, the Pharmaceutical, Health and Chemicals CEE will account for 25% of all the trade processed by their industries. On a daily basis, CEE staff process trade for participating importers, using their industry knowledge to resolve holds and mitigate requests for information or CF-28s—oftentimes before the accounts know it themselves. These efforts effectively reduce costs for the trade community, as Mr. Hayward noted, “Given the lack of angry calls I’ve gotten lately, I think we are doing a pretty good job.”

Ms. Cynthia Whittenburg, the newly minted Executive Director of Trade Policy and Programs for the Office of International Trade, indicated the CEEs will continue this good work, particularly once CBP fully deploys the Automated Commercial Environment (ACE). “We have a three-year finish line in view,” said Ms. Whittenburg. “CBP is communicating this timeline for completing all core cargo processing in ACE. Now we’ve given you our blueprint, make sure to have your software vendors hone in on what we are delivering so you don’t get left behind,” Ms. Whittenburg said.

Beyond their facilitative work, the CEEs have notable successes in the enforcement realm, utilizing a variety of targeting methods to interdict counterfeit pharmaceuticals. Focusing their efforts in the mail and express courier environments, CEE operations in 2012 yielded over 160 seizures with over 120,000 tablets—unsafe goods which the CEE kept from entering U.S. commerce.

During the workshop, leaders from the pharmaceutical, health and chemical industries spoke about disruptions to supply chains, engaging with CBP and Partner Government Agencies (PGAs) on new products, processes and facilitation challenges. Ms. Jill Mares from CareFusion spoke on her companies’ proactive approach to engaging with government regulators. “We don’t wait to reach out,” said Ms. Mares. “Bi-directional education has been effective for reaching solutions when we experience holds or delays.” Ms. Mares emphasized how industry supply chains are both scalable and flexible to adapt to changes in the trade environment, a reality that CBP’s CEEs neatly complement.

Ms. Susie Hoeger, Director of Global Trade Compliance from Abbott Laboratories, indicated that CEE knowledge of their supply chain would assist with U.S. Customs and Trade Partnership Against Terrorism (C-TPAT) revalidations. “Our product is extremely valuable and we, of course, have security systems to protect it—but we have to remember to outline this process for CBP,” said Ms. Hoeger.

Several speakers noted that the CEEs are the nexus for engaging with the government on all questions for their imports. Mr. David Ulrich, Quality Assurance Director of the Distribution and Supply Chain Strategic Quality Initiatives at AbbVie, indicated that, “We have taken the initial first steps to develop best practices for pharmaceutical imports. The CEE can advance that conversation to further CBP’s informed compliance efforts.”

Mr. Hayward concluded the key themes of the productive two-day workshop. “On every topic we’ve discussed thus far, It is clear that the CEE represents an effective choke point in resolving the gauntlet of importing issues—from holds, to engagements with PGAs,” said Mr. Hayward, “In closing, I want to affirm today that the CEEs represent the future for how CBP is processing trade—we are the informed compliance for the 21st Century. It is only by co-creating best practices with industry that we will grow as regulators and facilitators.”


Secretary Jewell Announces Members of Advisory Council on Wildlife Trafficking, Additional Steps to Combat Poaching
U.S. Department of the Interior / http://www.doi.gov/news/pressreleases/secretary-jewell-announces-members-of-advisory-council-on-wildlife-trafficking-additional-steps-to-combat-poaching.cfm

WASHINGTON, DC – Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell named the members of a new federal council on wildlife trafficking during a Forum to Counter Wildlife Trafficking held at the White House today. The panel will advise the Secretary and members of the Presidential Task Force on Wildlife Trafficking, a federal interagency group, on ways to improve coordination and implementation of domestic and international efforts to fight wildlife trafficking and poaching.  

“Poaching of wildlife has become a crisis that threatens large numbers of species including elephants, rhinos, great apes, tigers, sharks, tuna and turtles,” Jewell said. “With guidance from the new Advisory Council on Wildlife Trafficking, we will continue to work in partnership with countries where these animals live and roam and other nations to shut down the illegal trade in wildlife products and to bring poachers and traffickers to justice.”

Jewell also announced that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service plans to crush and destroy approximately six tons of elephant ivory seized by its special agents and wildlife inspectors for violations of U.S. wildlife laws. The ivory “crush” is part of a series of upcoming coordinated actions that will spotlight the rising tide of poaching and trafficking that is threatening wild populations of elephants, rhinoceros and other iconic species – and strengthen global efforts to crack down on these criminal activities.

“Rising demand for ivory is fueling a renewed and horrific slaughter of elephants in Africa, threatening remaining populations across the continent,” Jewell said. “We will continue to work aggressively with the Departments of Justice and State, as well as with international law enforcement agencies, to disrupt and prosecute criminals who traffic in ivory, and we encourage other nations to join us in that effort.”

The Service plans to destroy the confiscated ivory, which is being held in secure storage at the agency’s National Wildlife Property Repository near Denver, Colorado, on October 8, 2013. The material will include raw and carved whole tusks, smaller carvings, and other elephant ivory items abandoned or forfeited to the Service as a result of its criminal investigations in the United States and overseas, as well as its anti-smuggling efforts at the nation’s ports of entry over the past 25 years.

 The agency is also reviewing its existing regulations and policies and will propose several changes in the coming weeks designed to close loopholes that currently make it easier for criminals to smuggle ivory and other wildlife products in violation of U.S. and international law.

 In addition, the Service is stepping up efforts to train game officers, customs officials and police across Africa, Latin America and Asia, and to provide equipment and other logistical and technical support to build the capacity of range countries to combat trafficking and poaching within their borders.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Director Dan Ashe, who attended today’s White House event and will oversee the Council’s activities, noted that the ongoing slaughter of elephants and other species isn’t just an issue in Africa.

“The United States is part of the problem, because much of the world’s trade in wild animal and plant species – both legal and illegal – is driven by U.S. consumers or passes through our ports on the way to other nations. We have to be part of the solution,” Ashe said. “The species and habitats of our planet support billions of people and drive the world’s economy. We all have a stake in ensuring their survival.”

Ashe added, “Similar demand for elephant ivory led to devastating declines in the number of these giant animals, particularly in the 1970s and 1980s. Though many populations showed signs of recovery due to increased protections in the 1990s, rising global demand for ivory is erasing those hard-fought gains.”

An estimated 11,000 forest elephants were killed in the past decade in one park alone (Gabon’s Minkebe National Park), and the total population of forest elephants is down by an estimated 62 percent in that time period across the Central Africa zone. Elephant massacres have taken place in Chad, Cameroon, and the Central African Republic in the past year, as well-armed and organized criminal enterprises have taken advantage of insufficient protection capacity in remote landscapes and the rising price of ivory on illegal markets.

The Fish and Wildlife Service will provide critical support this year through its Wildlife Without Borders Multinational Species Conservation Funds for 171 projects benefiting elephants, rhinos and tigers, and great apes. These projects will receive more than $8.6 million in grant funding that will be matched by approximately $14.3 million from foreign governments and non-governmental organizations. Many of those awards will be made in the coming weeks to help address the poaching and trafficking crisis.

Ashe also noted that citizens who want to directly contribute to on-the-ground efforts to protect these imperiled species can purchase the Save Vanishing Species semi postal stamp at their local post office or online. Sales of the stamp, which sells for just a few cents more than first class stamps, have raised nearly $2.4 million to support on-the-ground conservation of species through the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's Wildlife Without Borders programs since the stamp went on sale in September 2011.  

Thirty three conservation projects in 23 countries have already been funded with $1.3 million of stamp proceeds, with more to come. For more information on the Save Vanishing Species semi postal stamp, including where to purchase it, click here.

Due to security concerns and limited space, the upcoming ivory crush will not be open to the public. Invited guests and credentialed media will be allowed on site. Additional information on Fish and Wildlife Service efforts to support conservation of elephants and other imperiled species across the globe can be found at http://www.fws.gov/international.


USITC Will Conduct Full Five-Year (Sunset) Reviews Concerning Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod from Brazil, Indonesia, Mexico, Moldova, Trinidad and Tobago, and Ukraine
U.S. International Trade Commission / http://www.usitc.gov/press_room/news_release/2013/er0906ll1.htm?source=govdelivery&utm_medium=email&utm_source=govdelivery

The U.S. International Trade Commission (USITC or Commission) has voted to conduct full five- year ("sunset") reviews concerning the countervailing duty order on carbon and certain alloy steel wire rod ("wire rod") from Brazil and the antidumping duty orders on wire rod from Brazil, Indonesia, Mexico, Moldova, Trinidad and Tobago, and Ukraine (Inv. Nos. 701-TA-417 and 731-TA- 953, 957-959, 961, and 962 (Second Review)).

As a result of these votes, the Commission will conduct full reviews to determine whether revocation of these orders would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of material injury within a reasonably foreseeable time.

The Uruguay Round Agreements Act requires the Department of Commerce to revoke an antidumping or countervailing duty order, or terminate a suspension agreement, after five years unless the Department of Commerce and the USITC determine that revoking the order or terminating the suspension agreement would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of dumping or subsidies (Commerce) and of material injury (USITC) within a reasonably foreseeable time.

The Commission's notice of institution in five-year reviews requests that interested parties file with the Commission responses that discuss the likely effects of revoking the order under review and provide other pertinent information. Generally within 95 days from institution, the Commission will determine whether the responses it has received reflect an adequate or inadequate level of interest in a full review. If responses to the USITC's notice of institution are adequate, or if other circumstances warrant a full review, the Commission conducts a full review, which includes a public hearing and issuance of questionnaires.

With regard to Mexico, all six Commissioners concluded that both the domestic group response and the respondent group response for this review were adequate and voted for a full review.

With regard to Brazil, Indonesia, Moldova, Trinidad and Tobago, and Ukraine, all six Commissioners concluded that the domestic group response for these reviews was adequate and that the respondent group responses were inadequate, but that circumstances warranted full reviews.

A record of the Commission's votes on these matters is available from the Office of the Secretary, U.S. International Trade Commission, 500 E Street SW, Washington, DC 20436. Requests may be made by telephone by calling 202-205-1802.

The record of the Commission's votes is also posted on the USITC's Internet site at http://pubapps2.usitc.gov/sunset/caseProf/list?sort=caseTitle&order=asc. From this page, search "steel wire rod" using the search box in the upper right corner.

The Federal Register notice will indicate whether any further information or statements will be available. The Commission will issue a report after it completes its reviews.


USITC Will Conduct Full Five-Year (Sunset) Review Concerning Silicon Metal from Russia
U.S. International Trade Commission / http://www.usitc.gov/press_room/news_release/2013/er0906ll3.htm?source=govdelivery&utm_medium=email&utm_source=govdelivery

The U.S. International Trade Commission (USITC or Commission) has voted to conduct a full five- year ("sunset") review concerning the antidumping duty order on silicon metal from Russia (Inv. No. 731-TA-991 (Second Review)).

As a result of this vote, the Commission will conduct a full review to determine whether revocation of this order would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of material injury within a reasonably foreseeable time.

The Uruguay Round Agreements Act requires the Department of Commerce to revoke an antidumping or countervailing duty order, or terminate a suspension agreement, after five years unless the Department of Commerce and the USITC determine that revoking the order or terminating the suspension agreement would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of dumping or subsidies (Commerce) and of material injury (USITC) within a reasonably foreseeable time.

The Commission's notice of institution in five-year reviews requests that interested parties file with the Commission responses that discuss the likely effects of revoking the order under review and provide other pertinent information. Generally within 95 days from institution, the Commission will determine whether the responses it has received reflect an adequate or inadequate level of interest in a full review. If responses to the USITC's notice of institution are adequate, or if other circumstances warrant a full review, the Commission conducts a full review, which includes a public hearing and issuance of questionnaires.

All six Commissioners concluded that both the domestic group response and the respondent group response for this review were adequate and voted for a full review.

A record of the Commission's vote on this matter is available from the Office of the Secretary, U.S. International Trade Commission, 500 E Street SW, Washington, DC 20436. Requests may be made by telephone by calling 202-205-1802.

The record of the Commission's vote is also posted on the USITC's Internet site at http://pubapps2.usitc.gov/sunset/caseProf/list?sort=caseTitle&order=asc. From this page, search "silicon metal" using the search box in the upper right corner.

The Federal Register notice will indicate whether any further information or statements will be available. The Commission will issue a report after it completes its review.


Treasury Exposes Iranian Attempts to Evade Oil Sanctions
U.S. Department of the Treasury / http://www.treasury.gov/press-center/press-releases/Pages/jl2158.aspx

Action Targets Individuals and Companies Acting on Behalf of the Government of Iran

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Department of the Treasury today identified a network of six individuals and four businesses as subject to sanctions pursuant to Executive Order (E.O.) 13599 for acting for or on behalf of the Government of Iran.   These actions are part of the United States Government’s ongoing efforts to prevent sanctions evasion by individuals and companies acting on behalf of the Government of Iran, including efforts to sell Iranian oil in circumvention of the strict limitations that the U.S. and many of its partners have adopted.  

In its efforts to evade sanctions, the Government of Iran relies on front companies, financial institutions and businessmen willing to engage in deceptive transactions to conceal the direct involvement of the Iranian Government and its instrumentalities such as the National Iranian Oil Company (NIOC) and the Naftiran Intertrade Company (NICO) Sarl in global oil deals.  

Today’s action targets the network of Seyed Seyyedi, an Iranian businessman and the director of Sima General Trading, an entity previously sanctioned by Treasury; a network of companies based in the U.A.E. that Seyyedi controls; and representatives of NIOC and NICO based in the UK and Switzerland.   

“Our sanctions on Iran’s oil sales are a critically important component of maintaining pressure on the Iranian Government, and we will not allow Iran to relieve that pressure through evasion and circumvention,” said Treasury Under Secretary for Terrorism and Financial Intelligence David S. Cohen.  “We will continue to target those individuals and entities that devise schemes to evade our sanctions.”

Seyed Seyyedi was identified pursuant to E.O. 13599 today for acting on behalf of various Government of Iran entities and front companies, including NIOC, NICO, as well as Sima General Trading.  Treasury previously identified Sima General Trading as part of a network of Iranian government front companies in March 2013 for its role in the sanctions evasion scheme being carried out by the Greek businessman, Dimitris Cambis.  Seyyedi’s Sima General Trading helped finance a Cambis front company to purchase oil tankers while disguising the fact that the tankers were being purchased on behalf of the National Iranian Tanker Company (NITC).  Cambis’ front companies were used to deceive the international business community by obscuring the Iranian ownership of ships capable of carrying roughly 200 million U.S. dollars worth of oil per shipment.  Treasury is also identifying the U.A.E. -based KASB International LLC, Petro Royal FZE, and AA Energy FZCO, each of which is controlled by Seyyedi and used by him to assist NICO and NICO front companies, such as Sima General Trading, in its sanctions evasion schemes.

In addition to Seyed Seyyedi, Treasury is also identifying several other persons and entities for their links to the Government of Iran’s operations to evade oil sanctions.
 
Swiss Management Services Sarl is a Swiss company controlled by NICO Sarl and used by NICO to continue its operations on behalf of Iran following multiple U.S. sanctions actions targeting NICO and NICO Sarl.  Mohmmad Moinie is Switzerland-based NICO Sarl’s commercial director.  

Reza Parsaei is a director for NIOC International Affairs (London) Ltd. which was identified as an entity of the Government of Iran in July 2010.  Parsaei has involved himself in a scheme to deceptively import Iranian oil into the EU.  Parsaei also coordinates closely with another director for NIOC International Affairs (London) Ltd., Seyyed Mohamad Ali Khatibi Tabatabaei.  Seyed Mohaddes and Mohammed Ziracchian Zadeh act as directors for the Iranian Oil Company (U.K.) Ltd., which was also identified as an entity of the Government of Iran in July 2010.

Each of the individuals and companies sanctioned today were identified under E.O. 13599, which blocks the property of the Government of Iran, including those of individuals and entities identified as acting for or on behalf of the Government of Iran.  Transactions by U.S. persons or through the United States with any of these entities are generally prohibited, and any assets they may have under U.S. jurisdiction are blocked.  Further, foreign persons and financial institutions that facilitate transactions for such persons or provide them with material support may also be exposed to sanctions.
Identifying information


CBP Officers Uncover Marijuana Hidden Inside Shipment of Limes
U.S. Customs & Border Protection / http://www.cbp.gov/xp/cgov/newsroom/news_releases/local/09102013_8.xml

Otay Mesa, Calif. — U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers on Friday discovered 1,623 pounds of marijuana concealed inside a shipment of limes at the Otay Mesa cargo facility. 

The incident occurred September 6 at about 4:45 p.m., when CBP officers encountered a 47-year-old male driving a 1994 Kenworth tractor pulling a trailer with a shipment of limes. The officer referred the truck to the dock area for a more in-depth examination.

While conducting an intensive inspection of the conveyance, CBP officers utilized the port’s imaging system and detected anomalies within the cardboard boxes of limes. A canine team screened the trailer and the detector dog alerted to the limes, leading officers to the discovery of 270 wrapped packages of marijuana hidden inside the boxes.

A total of 1,623 pounds of marijuana was offloaded, valued at an estimated $730,350.

The driver, a Mexican citizen and resident of Tijuana, Baja California, was arrested and transported to the Metropolitan Correctional Center where he currently awaits arraignment.

CBP seized the narcotics and conveyance.


ICE Launches Smartphone App to Locate Predators, Rescue Children from Sexual Abuse and Exploitation
U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement / http://content.govdelivery.com/accounts/USDHSICE/bulletins/8ab819

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) sent this bulletin at 09/12/2013 09:49 AM EDT

WASHINGTON – U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s (ICE) Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) is launching a new smartphone app – the first of its kind in U.S. federal law enforcement – designed to seek the public’s help with fugitive and unknown suspect child predators. All tips can be reported anonymously through the app, by phone or online, 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

The most urgent case involves an unidentified man wanted for producing child pornography involving the sexual abuse of a 10 to 12-year-old girl. This “John Doe” is an unknown suspect and is believed to be living somewhere in the United States or Canada, but he could be anywhere in the world. The first video file was discovered by Interpol and submitted to the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children in 2006. The full series was last seen by HSI special agents in Los Angeles in 2013 during execution of a search warrant. The four videos show the prepubescent girl being sexually abused by an adult male with short brown hair and blue eyes.  In the videos, the offender has a full beard and wears glasses. Both he and the child are seen in a room with wood paneled walls with framed photos, a black computer, desk with sewing machine and brown patterned curtains.

In addition to profiling John Doe cases like this, the new smartphone app contains photos and information about known fugitives in HSI criminal cases involving sexually abused and exploited children.

“When children are being sexually abused and exploited, it’s a race against the clock to rescue the child and bring the predator to justice,” said ICE Acting Director John Sandweg. “These investigations are one of our highest priorities, and in today’s world, we need to be technologically savvy and innovative in our approach.”

ICE’s Office of Public Affairs developed the app with special agents from HSI’s Cyber Crimes Center (C3) and field offices across the country in order to seek the public’s help with information about child predators wanted for criminal prosecution.

“The creation and launch of this application provides ICE another useful tool to reach the public,” said ICE Director of Public Affairs Brian Hale. “We recognize that people receive a great deal of information on their mobile devices and we are hopeful that this app will encourage them to submit tips about suspects and to learn more about our work investigating child exploitation crimes.”

The Operation Predator App enables those who download it to receive alerts about wanted predators, to share the information with friends via email and social media tools, and to provide information to HSI by calling or submitting an online tip. Additionally, the app enables users to view news about arrests and prosecutions of child predators and additional resources about ICE and its global partners in the fight against child exploitation.

Currently, the app can be downloaded from Apple’s App Store or iTunes. ICE is also planning to expand compatibility to other smartphones in the near future.

HSI is requesting that anyone with information about John Doe or the other fugitives profiled to contact the agency in one of two ways: Call the ICE Tip Line, which is staffed 24-hours a day: (866) 347-2423 from the U.S. & Canada or (802) 872-6199 from anywhere in the world, or complete an online tip form at www.ice.gov/tips/.

Individuals should not attempt to apprehend the suspect personally.

HSI's Victim Identification Program seeks to rescue child victims of sexual abuse and exploitation and bring the perpetrators to justice.

These investigations are part of Operation Predator, a nationwide HSI initiative to protect children from sexual predators, including those who travel overseas for sex with minors, Internet child pornographers, criminal alien sex offenders and child sex traffickers. HSI encourages the public to report suspected child predators and any suspicious activity through its toll-free hotline at 1-866-347-2423 or by completing its online tip form. Both are staffed around the clock by investigators.

Suspected child sexual exploitation or missing children may be reported to the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children, an Operation Predator partner, via its toll-free 24-hour hotline, 1-800-843-5678.

HSI is a founding member and current chair of the Virtual Global Taskforce, an international alliance of law enforcement agencies and private industry sector partners working together to prevent and deter online child sexual abuse.
 
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